Michigan city – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 11:18:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Michigan city – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 Michigan City Considering Expanded Scholarship Eligibility | Local News https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-considering-expanded-scholarship-eligibility-local-news/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 00:06:04 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-considering-expanded-scholarship-eligibility-local-news/ “There will be a slow number of people leaving Michigan City area schools” if that passes, he said. City Councilor Paul Przybylinski, D-2nd, said data shows scholarship rules are not having a negative effect on Michigan City-area schools. People attend schools outside of town regardless of the scholarship program. “As a board member, my obligation […]]]>

“There will be a slow number of people leaving Michigan City area schools” if that passes, he said.

City Councilor Paul Przybylinski, D-2nd, said data shows scholarship rules are not having a negative effect on Michigan City-area schools. People attend schools outside of town regardless of the scholarship program.

“As a board member, my obligation is to all residents here in Michigan City, period,” Deuitch said. The potential boost for Michigan City High School is a side benefit.

“When I look at Chesterton, LaPorte and Westville, we are talking about over 150 students that we could get back,” she said. “Maybe we’ll see the tide turn, but we won’t know until we try. “

“I don’t want people to send their children out of town to go to school. I want them here, ”said Deuitch.

“We can argue that the school system is hampered, but it is definitely not the scholarship program,” Przybylinsky said. “Maybe the school system needs to use it as an awareness tool.”

“The premise of the Promise Scholarship was to encourage residency,” said Chairman of the Board Michael Mack, D-3rd. “Funding schools has nothing to do with all of this. “

City councilor Don Pryzbylinski, D-At-Large, was on the board when the program was launched. Even then, he thought it should be expanded to include tenants.


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Michigan City to Require Free Menstrual Products in All Public Restrooms: NPR https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-to-require-free-menstrual-products-in-all-public-restrooms-npr/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 21:43:02 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-to-require-free-menstrual-products-in-all-public-restrooms-npr/ A student stocks a school bathroom with free towels and tampons to promote menstrual equity at Justice High School in Falls Church, Va., In 2019. Alastair Pike / AFP via Getty Images hide caption toggle legend Alastair Pike / AFP via Getty Images A student stocks a school bathroom with free towels and tampons to […]]]>

A student stocks a school bathroom with free towels and tampons to promote menstrual equity at Justice High School in Falls Church, Va., In 2019.

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A student stocks a school bathroom with free towels and tampons to promote menstrual equity at Justice High School in Falls Church, Va., In 2019.

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Ann Arbor will require all public toilets in town to carry menstrual products under a new ordinance that goes into effect in January.

This means that towels and tampons, as well as soap and toilet paper, will need to be available free of charge in all public restrooms in the city of Michigan.

“As a society, for too long we haven’t taken menstruation seriously,” Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor told NPR. “Access to menstrual products is a basic human necessity.”

Some states and cities in the United States already provide free menstrual products in some places, such as schools and homeless shelters, but Taylor said he believes Ann Arbor was the first jurisdiction to require them in all public toilets.

“It is a matter of fairness and personal dignity,” he said. “I am just happy that we were able to provide a public good at a low cost. “

Last year, Scotland became the first country to offer free menstrual products.

Taylor said he came up with the order after hearing from a high school student who was concerned that people with no established residence would have difficulty obtaining menstrual products. Ann Arbor City Council unanimously passed the ordinance on Monday.

It comes just weeks after Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed two laws repealing the state’s tax on menstrual products, claiming it would save residents up to $ 4,800 in expenses in one. life.

The Ann Arbor ordinance applies to all public toilets regardless of gender, but it does not include private residences.

Violators could pay a civil fine not exceeding $ 100.


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Michigan city first in US to require tampons in public toilets https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-first-in-us-to-require-tampons-in-public-toilets/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:05:47 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-first-in-us-to-require-tampons-in-public-toilets/ DETROIT – A new ordinance in Ann Arbor, Mich. Requires all public toilets to provide users with free sanitary products, including towels and tampons, and it is believed to be the number one city in the United States to do it. The new ordinance, which came into effect on January 1, 2022, applies to all […]]]>


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developer to build $ 35 million downtown housing project in Michigan City | Northwest Indiana Business Titles https://blissfield.net/developer-to-build-35-million-downtown-housing-project-in-michigan-city-northwest-indiana-business-titles/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/developer-to-build-35-million-downtown-housing-project-in-michigan-city-northwest-indiana-business-titles/ Gilbert’s Candy serves Chesterton something sweet. “My husband and I recently opened a candy store in Chesterton specializing in our own candy as well as other small business candy and nostalgic candy,” said owner Jennifer Gilbert. “We sell both items that we make ourselves that are hard to find in small businesses across the country.” […]]]>

Gilbert’s Candy serves Chesterton something sweet.

“My husband and I recently opened a candy store in Chesterton specializing in our own candy as well as other small business candy and nostalgic candy,” said owner Jennifer Gilbert. “We sell both items that we make ourselves that are hard to find in small businesses across the country.”

The Confectionery is located at 1050 Broadway in The Factory, which is the same building occupied by Chesterton Brewery, Duneland Station Deli, and Mission Escape. It was a historic porcelain factory built about a century ago.

Gilbert’s Candy specializes in chocolates but that’s not all.

“We became known for our root beer floating bar, our chocolate bar that really tastes like a root beer float,” Gilbert said.

Gilbert’s Candy also sells vintage candies like Slo Pokes, Charleston Chews, Bazooka Joe gum, Astro Pops, Wacky Wafers, Turkish Taffy, and Tart ‘N Tiny.

“It’s a nostalgic candy section,” she said. “It’s all the stuff we grew up with, plus it’s harder to find candy.”

She previously worked in a candy magazine, a job that allowed her to visit many candy factories. She and her husband David also love fudge when they visit Mackinac Island in Michigan.

They decided to start the business during the coronavirus pandemic.

“When it all closed my husband was looking for something to make him happy,” she said. “Candy always makes people happy. It was a good thing to bring community.”


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Obituary of Kevin Marciniak (1981 – 2021) – Michigan City, IN https://blissfield.net/obituary-of-kevin-marciniak-1981-2021-michigan-city-in/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/obituary-of-kevin-marciniak-1981-2021-michigan-city-in/ Kevin M. Marciniak, 40, of Michiana Shores, Indiana, passed away suddenly at his home on Saturday, November 13, 2021. Kevin was born on October 1, 1981 in Valparaiso, Indiana, to Stephen and Cheryl Marciniak. He is survived by his parents; brothers, Nicholas Marciniak and Scot (Jake Nieman) Marciniak; nieces, Averie and Jessie; and her beloved […]]]>

Kevin M. Marciniak, 40, of Michiana Shores, Indiana, passed away suddenly at his home on Saturday, November 13, 2021. Kevin was born on October 1, 1981 in Valparaiso, Indiana, to Stephen and Cheryl Marciniak.

He is survived by his parents; brothers, Nicholas Marciniak and Scot (Jake Nieman) Marciniak; nieces, Averie and Jessie; and her beloved cat, Adonis. He was predeceased by his grandparents, William and Kathryn Marciniak and Al and Lydia Anderson.

Kevin graduated from Michigan City High School in 2000 and went on to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science as well as a Minor in Japanese from the University of Valparaiso. He was very interested in Japanese culture and art and had even started drawing manga. He was a member of the Michigan City State Championship chess team. Kevin worked as Software Tech for the Michigan City School System and was an accomplished photographer. He loved to paint and was a true “tech geek” in every sense of the word. Kevin was a free spirit and loved to try new adventures. He lived fully and will be sadly missed by all who were fortunate enough to know him.

Friends are invited to meet with Kevin’s family on Thursday, November 18, 2021 from 4 pm to 8 pm at the Geisen-Carlisle Funeral Home, 613 Washington Street, Michigan City, IN, 46360. Private family services will be held.

Commemorative contributions can be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, https://www.alz.org/.

To sign the online guestbook or leave your condolences, please visit: www.Carlislefh.com. 219-874-4214.

Posted by La Porte County Herald-Dispatch on November 15, 2021.


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Michigan city’s new Arab-American mayor is a sign of progress https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-new-arab-american-mayor-is-a-sign-of-progress/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-new-arab-american-mayor-is-a-sign-of-progress/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 14:00:58 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-new-arab-american-mayor-is-a-sign-of-progress/ Many stories will be written about the significance of the 2021 election across the United States, but for me the most important news was Abdullah Hammoud’s victory as mayor of Dearborn, Michigan. In many ways, this city has played a central role in the work to empower the Arab-American community. Since entering politics as an […]]]>

Many stories will be written about the significance of the 2021 election across the United States, but for me the most important news was Abdullah Hammoud’s victory as mayor of Dearborn, Michigan. In many ways, this city has played a central role in the work to empower the Arab-American community.

Since entering politics as an organized constituency in the late 1970s, Arab Americans have experienced painful cases of rejection and exclusion. In 1983, a candidate for mayor from Philadelphia attended a fundraiser organized by American Arabs. After being blamed by his opponent for “taking Arab money”, he returned the donations. Others, when challenged, either purged their campaigns of Arab-American personnel or avoided the community altogether.

Then in 1984 came Reverend Jesse Jackson and his historic campaign for President. It was the first national effort to welcome the Arab-American community into its coalition. The response has been overwhelming. Excited by Mr. Jackson’s recognition and respect, the Arab-American community has turned out in large numbers for his events across the country. And Dearborn was no exception. After the elections, we realized the importance of capitalizing on this experience and created the Arab-American Institute to continue the momentum created by the 1984 elections. The institute is committed to increasing registration. Arab-American voters and to ensure that more Arab-Americans stand for election.

While we were initially focused on preparing for the 1988 presidential elections, something happened after our founding meeting in early 1985 that caused us to refocus our efforts. A young Arab-American woman from Dearborn, who had attended this foundational event, called our office to tell us that a long-standing mayoral candidate that year had sent a tabloid to every household in the city in saying, “Let’s talk about the ‘Arab problem’. The “problem”, as he described it, was that there were too many of them, didn’t speak our language, didn’t share our values, and “ruined our damn good way of life.” His racist speech worked and he won.

Dearborn is a small town adjacent to Detroit. In the 1980s, it had around 90,000 inhabitants. It housed one of the main factories of Ford Motor Company. Designed by Henry Ford at the turn of the 20th century, the city was closely linked to the automobile industry. Workers and their families lived among and near the factory and steelworks on the east side of town, while the more upscale west housed executives and white-collar workers.

Because Ford was known to have racist views, in addition to separating its workforce, few blacks or Jews were allowed into the community. Over the years, new immigrants arrived in Dearborn, attracted by the prospect of employment at Ford. By settling in, they replaced those who had come before and had since moved up the ranks of social and economic mobility.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Arabs were the new immigrants, many having left Lebanon during its civil war, with particularly large numbers from southern Lebanon arriving after the Israeli invasion and occupation. So it was perhaps not surprising that a candidate would make a racist appeal against the “newcomers”. Expected, but still shocking and painful.

I flew to Dearborn the day after hearing the hurtful tabloid news and spoke at a large community gathering. I will never forget the painful look of rejection on their faces. And so I said to them, “You are not Dearborn’s problem – you are his promise and his future. We learned that because the community was so new and their voter registration was low, the mayoral candidate felt they were an easy target. Working with several large local community groups, we hired staff and invested resources in voter registration and mobilization efforts.

You are not Dearborn’s problem – you are his promise and his future

James Zogby to American Arabs in Dearborn, Michigan in 1985

Four years later, the woman who called our office to report on the tabloid, Suzanne Sareini, was elected to city council – the first Arab-American elected in the city. Ten years later, with more than 7,000 Arab-American voters, the same mayor spoke at one of our events. He started his remarks in Arabic and gave me the symbolic “Key to the city”.

At an event in Dearborn we hosted in 2003, every Democrat running for president made an appearance. In 2013, the president and the majority of the city council were American Arabs. And now Dearborn, with American Arabs constituting the majority of its inhabitants, has its first Arab-American mayor.

Abdullah Hammoud is a classic American story. His parents are immigrants from Lebanon. Her father was a truck driver. Her mother ran a small business. Mr. Hammoud, who holds two master’s degrees, was elected state representative in 2017 and again in 2019 – the first Arab American to represent Dearborn in the Michigan legislature. His opponent attempted to bait him during the campaign, suggesting that Mr Hammoud was running to represent “his community” as he was running to represent the whole of Dearborn. Mr Hammoud, however, remained positive and focused on the needs of the city.

In addition to winning the mayoral race, four of the seven board members are Arab-Americans, including Ms Sareini’s son Michael, who was elected chairman of the board. The police chief is Arab-American, as are several judges and the three directors of Dearborn public high schools. And the city’s Arab-American business community continues to bring the city to life, contributing to the overall Detroit metro renewal. Importantly, the city of Dearborn Heights also elected an Arab-American mayor, William Bazzi, as did Hamtramck, who elected Amer Ghalib, a Yemeni immigrant and now the city’s first Arab-American mayor.

The Arab-American community has shown that we are truly the “promise” of our cities and states. Ours is a story we all need to remember in times like these.

Posted: Nov 8, 2021, 2:00 p.m.


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Michigan City’s First Arab-American Mayor Has Message For His Youth: “Be Proud Of Your Name” https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 17:44:51 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/ By Alaa Elassar, CNN A Michigan city considered the center of Arab America has finally elected its first Arab-American mayor. Abdullah Hammoud, the son of Lebanese immigrants, was born and raised in Dearborn, where he was elected mayor on Tuesday. With this victory, he also becomes the city’s first Muslim mayor. Dearborn is home to […]]]>

By Alaa Elassar, CNN

A Michigan city considered the center of Arab America has finally elected its first Arab-American mayor.

Abdullah Hammoud, the son of Lebanese immigrants, was born and raised in Dearborn, where he was elected mayor on Tuesday. With this victory, he also becomes the city’s first Muslim mayor.

Dearborn is home to one of the largest Arab-American communities in the USA. Dearborn’s population is around 42% Arabs, according to census figures. But more recent surveys suggest the city may be more than half Arab.

Despite the city’s large Arab community, it has never been run by an Arab-American or a Muslim-American.

“It’s just an experience of humility. It’s humiliating that in this city people are willing to vote for someone based on the direction they are leading, not the direction they are praying, ”Hammoud, 31, told CNN. “It is a lesson in humility because it shows that someone like me, who bears a name like Abdullah Hussein Hammoud, does not have to change or flee his identity in order to be successful.”

Hammoud is serving his third term as state representative for Michigan’s 15th District, which includes Dearborn. He was first elected in 2016 and has since been re-elected twice.

He will take office as mayor in January.

“This is a huge deal for the Arab community in Michigan and the country,” Sally Howell, director of the Center for Arab American Studies at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, told CNN. “The symbolic capital of Arab America, Dearborn, Michigan, finally has an Arab-American mayor to speak on behalf of this unique population. Representation matters.

Hammoud says he’s ready to get down to business and immediately start tackling the issues affecting his city, including climate change.

“There is a clock on the wall, and there is the question of when the next heavy rain is going to set in that will lead to the next catastrophic flood, similar to what we experienced last summer when near more than 20,000 homes have experienced some type of flooding, ”Hammoud said.

“We must immediately start adjusting the climate crisis by presenting bold and innovative proposals,” he said.

Hammoud will also work to cut taxes and help residents fight the health and economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic, according to his campaign website.

Hammoud says he hopes his victory sends a message to the young people of Dearborn – especially those who are targeted because of their differences – that nothing is out of reach.

“Never fear who you are,” he said. “Be proud of your name, be comfortable in your identity, because it will move you forward if you work hard, if you are passionate and if you inspire people.”

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Michigan city on edge as lead-water crisis persists https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 16:09:09 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/ BENTON HARBOR— Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water. Free water distribution sites are part of life in the predominantly black city, where nearly half […]]]>

BENTON HARBOR— Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water.

Free water distribution sites are part of life in the predominantly black city, where nearly half of the estimated 10,000 residents live below the poverty line. For three years, tests of its public water system revealed high levels of lead.

It takes time to wait for bottled water, and some residents are wondering why, in a state that recently faced the Flint water crisis, the problem was not resolved sooner.

“It’s tiring,” said Rhonda Nelson, queuing at a site run by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Benton Harbor.


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Michigan city on edge as lead-water crisis persists https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:42:13 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/ BENTON HARBOR, Michigan – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water. Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black city […]]]>

BENTON HARBOR, Michigan – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water.

Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black city of southwest Michigan, where nearly half of the estimated 10,000 residents live below the poverty line. For three years, tests of its public water system revealed high levels of lead.

It takes time to wait for free bottled water, and some residents are wondering why, in a state that recently faced the Flint water crisis, the problem was not resolved sooner.

“It’s tiring,” said Rhonda Nelson, queuing at a site run by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Benton Harbor.

“I understand what Flint was going through, I really understand it,” she said.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has pledged to spend millions of dollars to replace the city’s main service lines within 18 months – a breakneck pace for a process that often takes decades. For now, residents have been warned not to cook, drink or prepare formula with tap water.

Residents are concerned about what the high levels of lead mean for the health of their families. The problem is embarrassing and stressful as well. Drivers line up early at water distribution sites, driving people away from work and families. Bottled water should be used with care so that it does not run out. Even queues have consequences – idling consumes gasoline that drivers have to pay to refuel more often.

Standing in line, LaKeena Crawford worried about the consequences for her 8-year-old daughter, who she saw trying to turn on the water.

“I’m like ‘No!’ Crawford said, adding that she wanted her daughter to understand that lead in water is dangerous. But, “I don’t want to scare him too much.”

Exposure to lead can slow cognitive development, especially in young children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and federal officials say no amount of lead in drinking water is considered safe for their consumption. In recent months, activists have pressed for more immediate and aggressive action, and the state has stepped up its response.

Some wonder if the problem would have been resolved more quickly if the residents of Benton Harbor were more like those of neighboring, predominantly white St. Joseph.

“Sometimes it’s enough to speak out against racism, and that’s what it feels like,” said Ambie Bell, helping distribute water to residents.

There are millions of aging underground lead lines connecting buildings to water pipes across the country, mostly in the Midwest, but also scattered across other states like New Jersey and Massachusetts. Old pipes can become an urgent risk to public health. Newark, New Jersey, experienced prolonged lead water problems which led to the rapid replacement of thousands of lead pipes. The high test results in Clarksburg, West Virginia, sounded the alarm earlier this year. The word Flint is now synonymous with lead water problems.

Digging up and replacing lead service lines is costly, straining tight local budgets. Infrastructure and reconciliation bills pending in Congress include billions to deal with leadline replacement which activists say could make a significant difference.

The lead water problem in Flint began when this town switched its water source to the Flint River as a temporary saving measure without proper treatment, corroding its lead pipes. But Benton Harbor’s water source, Lake Michigan, is considered safe and many other places find their water there, said City Manager Ellis Mitchell.

“Our problem is clearly our own infrastructure,” he said.

On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency identified a series of violations at the Benton Harbor water facility. Federal inspection has found problems so serious that the city must consider relinquishing ownership, the EPA said.

“The people of Benton Harbor have suffered for too long,” EPA administrator Michael Regan said in a statement.

Water systems sometimes produce high test results, but in Benton Harbor authorities have been unable to bring them down. The long-term solution is to replace the roughly 2,400 pipes that may contain lead, state officials said.

The city also lacks resources. Previous governors installed emergency managers with broad decision-making power that downsized, and the city’s population shrank, reducing its tax base.

“This results in a ripple effect of reduced technical, managerial and financial capacity at the water plant due to underinvestment in personnel, equipment and training,” said Scott Dean, Door -speaking of the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

After the Flint water crisis, Michigan tightened requirements for lead in drinking water in 2018, boasting that it passed the most protective law in the country. He imposed more stringent requirements for testing water for lead and demanded that old lead service lines be replaced.

Environmental groups and local activists filed a petition on Benton Harbor in September with the EPA, calling for aggressive action. Reverend Edward Pinkney, an activist named on the petition, said if they had not filed a request, an aggressive official response might have taken even longer.

“We couldn’t take it anymore,” said Pinkney.

The Michigan House of Representatives oversight committee held a hearing last month on Benton Harbor. Republican Committee Chairman Steven Johnson asked why the state’s recent response to the city’s main crisis makes it appear to have gone “from zero to 100 miles an hour” even though the problem has persisted for years.

Michigan officials said they took the issue seriously, and on Thursday Governor Whitmer issued a directive calling for a review of current drinking water rules, including looking at ways to reduce lead levels and ensure that communities fully inform the public in the event of a problem.

Previous efforts have included providing Benton Harbor residents with filters to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water, although their effectiveness is under review, and corrosion control to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water. the pipes. While the overall lead sampling results are still too high, the proportion of high readings has declined, officials said.

Inspectors, however, have hit the city for failing to notify water customers in their water bills of the problem during a recent one-year period.

Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician and professor at Michigan State University who sounded the alarm bells about Flint. She receives questions from parents to find out if a developmental problem could be related to lead in the water. However, it is extremely difficult to establish a direct link between an individual’s health problem and lead in water.

“This is why lead poisoning has eluded diagnosis, treatment and prevention for so long,” she said, adding that lead exposure is not safe for children and that ‘It’s too early to predict what the long-term impact might be. Lead levels can vary among households, and individuals may respond to exposure differently. The impact may also depend on other factors like poverty, which makes it particularly important to tackle the problem in cities like Benton Harbor, she said.

Marc A. Edwards, a professor at Virginia Tech who specializes in water treatment, said the focus on Benton Harbor highlights a national problem with cities struggling with high lead levels. He said major water crises like Flint erode public confidence in the official management of water systems.

Sylvester Bownes, who wears a prosthetic right leg, said he had been drinking bottled water for years because he didn’t trust the water in Benton Harbor.

Pushing a makeshift cart full of several cases of bottled water half a mile from his home, he said a broken water pipe temporarily cut off the public water supply, so no running water, he not only needed bottled water for drinking, but water for basic needs like filling his toilet.

“Water is everything,” Bownes said. “It’s like gold.”

Homebound residents can call a hotline for water, but Bownes said the process is taking too long and unreliable. State officials said hundreds of people have been added to a list of weekly deliveries. If there are any issues, residents should report them, they said.

Mitchell, the city manager, said last month that customers are charged for water which authorities say can still be used for tasks such as laundry and washing up. He said the city was looking to see if there was any kind of relief about it for residents.

At the Boys & Girls Club, volunteers distributed nearly 2,200 cases at noon.

Nelson, who has daughters of 12 and 14 and a 5-year-old son, said preparing dinner may require 15 to 20 bottles of water. “I hope they fix it soon,” she said.

Greg Johnson, who was the first to stop around 8:15 a.m., said he arrived early so his family’s supplies could be replenished for his daughters, aged 8 and 11.

“It takes two cases in the morning to get them ready for school,” he said. “They have to wash up and stuff. It’s a bit hectic. “

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The Associated Press receives support from the Walton Family Foundation for coverage of water and environmental policy. The AP is solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s environmental coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/environment


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How Mishawaka plans to beat Michigan City in the section final https://blissfield.net/how-mishawaka-plans-to-beat-michigan-city-in-the-section-final/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/how-mishawaka-plans-to-beat-michigan-city-in-the-section-final/ MISHAWAKA – There isn’t much that connects childbirth to football. But Mishawaka coach Keith Kinder has found a way with this year’s playoffs only his team don’t fight for nine months, rather another week of football to extend their season. Last Friday, the seventh-ranked Cavemen beat the No.6 Concord 35-7 in the section semifinals to […]]]>

MISHAWAKA – There isn’t much that connects childbirth to football. But Mishawaka coach Keith Kinder has found a way with this year’s playoffs only his team don’t fight for nine months, rather another week of football to extend their season.

Last Friday, the seventh-ranked Cavemen beat the No.6 Concord 35-7 in the section semifinals to advance to the Class 5A playoffs. Now they have a chance of winning a fourth straight sectional championship on Friday night when the Michigan City No.10 visits Steele Stadium. Kick-off is at 7:30 p.m.

“The good thing is we’re still playing,” Kinder said. “It was the topic of discussion all week and it’s the same topic of discussion this week. Like every week now, it’s like being reborn and you are fighting to stay alive for another rebirth. that we’re trying to do right now. “


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