Michigan county – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 01:52:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Michigan county – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 2020 election upheaval continues to strain Michigan County | New https://blissfield.net/2020-election-upheaval-continues-to-strain-michigan-county-new/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/2020-election-upheaval-continues-to-strain-michigan-county-new/ TRAVERSE CITY – A federal magistrate has recommended dismissing a civil action brought against the January 6 Committee by a lobbyist from Washington, D.C., who in November 2020 flew to County Antrim by private jet as part of a team of political operatives researching local election data. Phone records of Katherine Friess, of Arlington, Virginia, […]]]>

TRAVERSE CITY – A federal magistrate has recommended dismissing a civil action brought against the January 6 Committee by a lobbyist from Washington, D.C., who in November 2020 flew to County Antrim by private jet as part of a team of political operatives researching local election data.

Phone records of Katherine Friess, of Arlington, Virginia, and Vail, Colorado, have already been subpoenaed by the US House Select Committee to investigate the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, according to the court records.

Friess, listed in 13th Circuit Court documents as an expert witness in a since-dismissed civil suit accusing County Antrim of voter fraud, sued the select committee, referring to her work as a solicitor for the former President Donald Trump.

The select committee searched for phone records, text messages, private messages and other communications from Friess, sent or received between November 1, 2020 and January 31, 2021, a period that includes dates Friess traveled to County Antrim.

On October 26, Magistrate Judge Kristen L. Mix recommended that a motion to dismiss filed on July 11 by attorneys representing the select committee be granted, which could clear the way for the committee to access Friess’ phone records.

Judge Mix said she was not convinced the information sought by the select committee could not be used “in the legislative sphere” and recommended dismissal due to lack of jurisdiction in the matter, according to court records.

This latest filing in a Colorado federal court 1,300 miles north of Michigan, has some local officials reflecting on how the repeatedly debunked fraud charges against the rural and extremely conservative county continue to strain strains local resources.

“It all just turned into a lot of extra work, extra staff time and extra money,” County Antrim Registrar Sheryl Guy said on Friday.

Guy said the county has so far spent about $90,000 defending against an election-related lawsuit filed by Central Lake man Bill Bailey and dismissed last year by the 13th Circuit Judge. Short, Kevin Elsenheimer.

On October 20, the County Antrim Board of Commissioners approved the expenditure of $21,250 to purchase a computer and five tabulators from Election Source, a voting equipment company, after the county previously leased the machines for the elections held in 2021 and in May and August this year.

Guy said the county’s previous election equipment is still considered evidence in the dismissed lawsuit because Bailey’s attorney, Matthew DePerno, has sought leave to appeal to the Michigan Supreme Court.

DePerno is the Republican-nominated candidate for state attorney general, running against Democratic incumbent Dana Nessel.

“Not knowing if the Supreme Court is going to hear the case, we could have done it for another year,” Guy said of ongoing rental costs.

The county spent $3,000 on voting equipment rental costs for the May and August elections in 2021 and the May elections this year, for a total of $9,000, and spent $10,500 on the August 2, 2022 primary election, Guy said.

County staff say they have also responded to a steady stream of Freedom of Information Act requests from a dizzying array of people seeking election and investigative information.

For example, in March of last year, a resident of Hartland, Michigan requested an audit of “software installations for all devices,” with lists of who installed the software, when it was installed. and contact information for any convenience store the county may seek for advice or assistance.

In late January, a staff reporter for New York-based ProPublica and a correspondent for Frontline, a PBS news program, requested a list of those who visited the county clerk’s office between Nov. 2020 and December 7. 2020 – the Record-Eagle released the list earlier that month.

In March, an attorney for Jackson Walker, LLP, an Austin, Texas law firm, filed a 117-page request seeking contracts, emails, bid proposals, text messages , bills and other communications between the county and Dominion Voting Systems, Inc.

In June, a New Jersey group, Voter Psychology, filed a request to inspect all 2020 general election ballots and the right to photograph the ballots.

Joan Shanahan, who handles records requests for the sheriff’s office, said this has been a particularly busy year and requests to that office could top the roughly 200 it received in 2021.

County Antrim has been the subject of repeated false allegations of fraud in the 2020 presidential election, following errors admitted by Guy and the staff who work in his office. In November 2020, Guy acknowledged that his office had failed to properly update Dominion Voting Systems software to accommodate ballot changes in some precincts ahead of the election.

“It’s so common that a lot of us have gone numb,” Guy said of how those she called “election deniers” sought to use the county to advance their debunked claims.

A report, Exhausting and Dangerous: The Serious Problem of Election Misinformation and Misinformation, released in August by a U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Reform, refers to the impact of lies about US elections in Michigan and other states.

“The mounting pressures facing election workers and administrators are compounded by a vicious cycle of misinformation designed to reduce public confidence in our electoral system,” the report said.

Lawyers for the select committee did not respond to a request for comment.

Friess, who also did not respond to a request for comment submitted to his attorney, Raymond A. Mansolillo, of Boston, has 14 days to respond to Judge Mix’s recommendation for dismissal.

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CDC urges masking in Michigan county this week https://blissfield.net/cdc-urges-masking-in-michigan-county-this-week/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 14:37:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/cdc-urges-masking-in-michigan-county-this-week/ Michigan’s four-week streak without a county at a high COVID-19 community level is over. Dickinson County in the Upper Peninsula is at a high community level this week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention map for Thursday, November 10. The CDC uses community levels to determine COVID risk, placing counties in one […]]]>

Michigan’s four-week streak without a county at a high COVID-19 community level is over.

Dickinson County in the Upper Peninsula is at a high community level this week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention map for Thursday, November 10.

The CDC uses community levels to determine COVID risk, placing counties in one of three buckets: low (green), medium (yellow), or high (orange).

The CDC recommends masking indoors in public when counties are at a high community level, regardless of vaccination status. However, people with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask regardless of where they live, according to the CDC.

Here is the latest map showing the community level for each county in Michigan. Tap or hover over a county to see details.

(Can’t see the map? Click here.)

Michigan has 44 counties at a low level and 38 counties at a medium level. Michigan last week had 55 counties at a low and 28 at an average.

The CDC considers cases and hospitalizations when determining the risk of COVID for an area. The aim is to prevent serious illnesses and limit the pressure on hospitals.

For community levels, the CDC looks at three factors for each county: the percentage of staffed hospital beds occupied by COVID patients, COVID hospital admissions per capita, and COVID cases per capita.

A county is at a high level when there are 200 or more new cases per 100,000 in the past week and either (A) more than 10 new COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 or (B) when at least 10% of inpatient beds are occupied by COVID patients.

If hospitalizations are particularly high, even a county with low cases may be high, according to the CDC’s formula.

(Not all counties have hospitals, so each is assigned a health service area, a geographic region that contains at least one hospital. Counties receive the calculated metrics for the entire area, weighted by each county’s population (Example: Monroe The County Health Services area also includes the Toledo, Ohio area.)

Here’s more county-level COVID data for Michigan from the past week.

Michigan reports 1,138 new confirmed cases per day over the past week

Reported COVID cases are down 14.0% this week, with Michigan averaging 1,138 new cases per day this week. This is the lowest rating since April 13.

Michigan also reported 289 “probable” cases of COVID per day this week.

Cases are “confirmed” when there is a positive NAAT/RT-PCR test result. Cases are ‘probable’ when there is a reported (rapid) antigen test or someone has symptoms and has been exposed to someone with COVID-19.

All charts in this story except the first (which uses CDC case calculations) are based on “confirmed” numbers only.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services reports COVID cases once a week. The department announced 9,992 confirmed and probable cases this week.

Michigan has reported more than 2.5 million confirmed COVID cases and more than 400,000 probable cases since the pandemic began.

The chart below shows the seven-day average of new confirmed COVID cases throughout the pandemic.

(Can’t see the board? Click here.)

Michigan ranks 13th in the United States for new cases per capita

Michigan has the 13th highest number of COVID cases per capita in the United States over the past week, according to The New York Times.

The states with the highest COVID rates this week were New Mexico, New York, New Jersey, North Dakota and Rhode Island. The states with the lowest COVID rates were Georgia, Texas, Mississippi, Louisiana and Alaska.

Michigan was 10th this week for most COVID hospitalizations per capita and fourth for most COVID deaths per capita.

28 counties have seen the number of cases increase in the past seven days

Of Michigan’s 83 counties, 28 had more COVID cases this week than last week.

Of the state’s largest counties, only Washtenaw County had more cases this week than last week (up 10%). Many others were down 17% or more, including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Genesee, Ingham and Kalamazoo counties.

Consult the database below to search/sort case totals by county. The graph also shows the percentage change from week to week and the seven-day average of cases per capita.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

10 Michigan counties most at risk for cases

There are 10 counties at the highest risk level (Level E) for cases, up from 15 counties last week.

The MDHHS has five levels of risk for COVID cases:

  • Level A: 7 to 19 cases per day per million inhabitants
  • Level B: 20 ​​to 39 cases per day per million
  • Level C: 40 to 69 cases per day per million
  • Level D: 70-149 cases per day per million
  • Level E: 150+ cases per day per million

The Upper Peninsula tops the list this week for the highest COVID rates, led by Baraga, Dickinson, Ontonagon, Gogebic, Menominee and Iron counties.

The lowest COVID rates this week were in Keweenaw, Chippewa, Emmet, Grand Traverse and Alpena counties.

The map below is shaded by the state’s six risk assessment levels from A to E. This is based on new cases reported per day and per million people from November 2-8.

Arrows on each county indicate whether new cases this week were up or down from the previous week. Place your cursor over a county to see the underlying data. (Tip: drag the map with your cursor to see the whole UP)

(Can’t see the map? Click here.)

The total number of COVID cases does not tell the whole story. Home tests are not reported, so they are not included in the data. This is why it is also essential to examine the percentage of positivity of the tests reported and the data on hospitalizations and deaths.

The average test positivity is 10%

Not only are cases declining, but so are positivity rates — a good sign. As of Tuesday, Nov. 8, about 10% of reported COVID tests in Michigan came back positive.

This is the lowest rating since June. The positivity rate hovered between 10% and 14% last week.

The World Health Organization considers substantial-level community transmission when positivity rates are above 5%.

Michigan’s rate peaked at 35% in January. It fell as low as 2% in early March before rising again.

The chart below shows the percentage of reported COVID-19 tests that came back positive throughout the pandemic.

(Can’t see the board? Click here.)

The positivity rate was highest this week in Algiers, Oscoda, Shiawassee, Leelanau and Manistee counties.

It was lowest in Chippewa, Keweenaw, Mecosta, Cheboygan and Emmet counties.

To see the COVID test positivity rate for your county, see the searchable table below.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

The interactive map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. Place your cursor over a county to see details.

(Can’t see the map? Click here.)

Hospitals treating 1,121 adult patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19

Adult hospitalizations for COVID fell 7.2% this week to 1,121, as of Wednesday, November 9. Last week’s 1,208 adults in hospital with COVID was the highest since February.

Of the 1,121, 143 were in intensive care and 66 were on a ventilator.

Michigan also had 32 children hospitalized with confirmed/suspected COVID as of Wednesday.

Michigan reports 20 new COVID deaths per day over the past week

COVID deaths have increased slightly this week, with an average of 20 people dying from COVID per day in Michigan. The state averaged 17 a day last week.

Deaths have hovered between 16 and 21 a day for the past two months.

During omicron’s peak in January, Michigan averaged more than 100 COVID deaths per day.

Michigan has had 35,984 confirmed COVID-19 deaths and 3,590 probable COVID deaths since the pandemic began. In other words, about one in every 279 Michigan residents has died of confirmed COVID.

Below is a graph illustrating the seven-day average of reported deaths throughout the pandemic.

(Can’t see the board? Click here.)

Vaccinations: 63.7% of residents received at least one dose

About 63.7% of Michigan residents have received at least one COVID vaccine, 58.9% have received the full original regimen and 35.4% have been boosted.

The omicron-specific COVID-19 booster is now available in Michigan from Pfizer and Moderna.

Below is a vaccination breakdown by age group of Michiganders who have received at least one vaccine (initiated) and those who are “completed”, i.e. two mRNA vaccines or one Johnson vaccine & Johnson, to Wednesday, November 9.

  • 75 years and over: 87.3% insiders; 82.2% complete
  • 65 to 74: 90.6% initiates; 86.3% complete
  • 50 to 64: 77.0% initiates; 72.6% complete
  • 40 to 49: 67.8% initiated; 62.9% complete
  • 30 to 39: 66.1% initiated; 60.1% complete
  • 20 to 29: 55.9% initiated; 49.8% complete
  • 16 to 19: 56.9% initiates; 52.0% complete
  • 12 to 15: 50.0% insiders; 46.4% complete
  • 5 to 11: 30.7% initiates; 27.9% complete
  • Less than 5 years: 8.0% initiated, 3.6% completed

For more statewide data, visit MLive’s coronavirus data page.

To find a testing site near you, visit the state’s online test search, email COVID19@michigan.gov, or call 888-535-6136 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. .

If you have questions about COVID-19, please submit them to covidquestions@mlive.com to consider for future MLive reports.

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Michigan County hires Jan. 6 participant for ‘alarming and chilling’ poll worker training: Secretary of State https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-hires-jan-6-participant-for-alarming-and-chilling-poll-worker-training-secretary-of-state/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 14:39:28 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-hires-jan-6-participant-for-alarming-and-chilling-poll-worker-training-secretary-of-state/ Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson spoke to Detroit radio station WDET on Monday about the election process, denouncing the employment of a Jan. 6 participant as a trainer for election officials. Macomb County Clerk Anthony Forlini hired Genevieve Peters — a social media influencer who was present at both the Jan. 6 Capitol riot […]]]>

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson spoke to Detroit radio station WDET on Monday about the election process, denouncing the employment of a Jan. 6 participant as a trainer for election officials.

Macomb County Clerk Anthony Forlini hired Genevieve Peters — a social media influencer who was present at both the Jan. 6 Capitol riot and a “Stop the Steal” protest outside Benson’s home — in May of this year to serve as a trainer for the worker survey.

Benson alluded to Peters specifically as a threat to the integrity of the election in his Monday interview with WDET.

MICHIGAN’S WHITMER REFERS TO WOMEN AS ‘PEOPLE WITH A PERIOD’ IN FINAL MID-TERM PITCH TO VOTERS

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson speaks at the Get Out the Vote rally in Detroit, October 29, 2022.
(Dominick Sokotoff/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

“I think it’s alarming, and scary, the decision the clerk has made,” Benson said in the interview. “Primarily because we know how important it is to protect the process from those who might seek to interfere or disrupt it.”

“But we also want to be transparent, and we also want to welcome people into the process with a very clear understanding of what the rules and the laws are,” she added.

Benson is running for re-election against Trump-endorsed Republican challenger Kristina Karamo.

JUDGE ORDERS MI SCHOOL TO ALLOW PRO-LIFE PITCH ON PUBLIC POLL SYSTEM DAY BEFORE ELECTION

Republican nominee for Secretary of State Kristina Karamo waves to the crowd before speaking at a Save America rally on October 1, 2022 in Warren, Michigan.

Republican nominee for Secretary of State Kristina Karamo waves to the crowd before speaking at a Save America rally on October 1, 2022 in Warren, Michigan.
(Emily Elconin/Getty Images)

Karamo recently lost a lawsuit that sought to prevent Detroit’s mail-in ballots from being counted in the midterm elections.

The Republican challenger sought to block ballots on the grounds that Detroit is too corrupt and compromised to be trusted to count ballots accurately. A judge dismissed the lawsuit for lack of evidence.

The Secretary of State also took the opportunity of the interview on Monday to warn of increased security and federal law enforcement, saying, “We hope for the best and expect the best, but we will have people across the state, including local state and federal law enforcement to enforce the law if anyone, at any point in any stage of the process, steps out of line, intimidates voters or attempts to interfere or disrupt elections.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

In this screenshot from the DNCC's live stream of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson addresses the virtual convention on August 20, 2020.

In this screenshot from the DNCC’s live stream of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson addresses the virtual convention on August 20, 2020.
(DNCC via Getty Images)

Benson claimed during the WDET interview that outside influencers will “definitely” try to disrupt the process.

“There will certainly be efforts to interfere with the smooth running of this process, but we have more than 50 people on the ground – a number of others, ready to go – to intervene immediately in the event of an attempt to disrupt the process. so voters can feel safe and know that their voice and their vote are protected,” Benson told WDET.

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Michigan County Council votes to withdraw funding for sheriff who conducted small investigation in 2020 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-council-votes-to-withdraw-funding-for-sheriff-who-conducted-small-investigation-in-2020/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:02:26 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-council-votes-to-withdraw-funding-for-sheriff-who-conducted-small-investigation-in-2020/ Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf is being investigated for allegedly tampering with voting machines. Dar Leaf, the Barry County sheriff in Michigan, lost funding for his department when the county’s all-Republican Board of Commissioners voted to revoke the stipend he made for an additional detective for Dar Leaf Sheriff’s Department. The Bridge Michigan website reported […]]]>

Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf is being investigated for allegedly tampering with voting machines.

Dar Leaf, the Barry County sheriff in Michigan, lost funding for his department when the county’s all-Republican Board of Commissioners voted to revoke the stipend he made for an additional detective for Dar Leaf Sheriff’s Department.

The Bridge Michigan website reported Oct. 28 that the council allocated funds last year to hire a third detective for the department to investigate violent crimes.

Leaf told the council in October that only one detective was assigned to violent crimes, while the other detective was solely focused on investigating the 2020 election and the third detective position was vacant. The sheriff defended that staff decision, telling council that “some things are going to happen,” according to the website.

Leaf is a member of the Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, a group of law enforcement officers who promote the idea that county sheriffs represent the ultimate legal authority in their jurisdictions, above state authorities. and federal, on the basis of the oath they take to uphold the Constitution of the United States.

Barry County Republican District Attorney Julie Nakfoor Pratt told the county board on Oct. 25 that her department needs detectives from the sheriff’s office to investigate violent crimes, not track down ghost incidents of voter fraud:

There is no evidence of large-scale voter fraud in this county. There’s just not that I can see. It’s been a year and a half. … If you have something, bring it; if you don’t, let’s move on. … We have things to do that are really important. We have victims who suffer, houses broken into. We even have a bank robbery that we’re trying to figure out. We have children who are sexually abused. We have adults who are sexually assaulted. We have stolen cars. We have mentally ill people who need our help.

Leaf is being investigated for an alleged plan to access and tamper with voter tabulation machines in several Michigan townships. The investigation by the state attorney general and state police involves several other prominent Michigan Republicans, including state Rep. Daire Rendon; Republican Attorney General nominee Matt DePerno; and attorney Stephanie Lambert, who was part of former President Donald Trump’s legal team.

The Michigan Republicans under investigation all amplified Trump’s lie that the 2020 election was stolen from him.

Pratt said she had a “heated” meeting about voter fraud with Leaf and Lambert in June 2021. A year later, they came to her asking for a warrant to inspect voter tabulation machines. She and one of her colleagues found no probable cause, so they denied the claim.

Betsy Colgen, a scrutineer for four years, told the council that allegations of widespread voter fraud were unfounded and urged anyone in doubt to organize an election to understand the process.

“It’s impossible to change votes, to play with the machine. There are so many checks and balances, it’s just unbelievable, every step of the way,” Colgen said.

At the board meeting, Leaf claimed without evidence that the voting machines could be programmed to reverse votes from one candidate to another.

“The machines are computerized, folks,” Leaf said.

He also suggested his investigation could extend far beyond Barry County, saying he was in contact with “whistleblowers” from Venezuela – a comment that had the room laughing.

Bridge Michigan reported that Barry County Commissioner Ben Geiger was prepared to drop Sheriff Leaf’s investigations: “We are pleased to hear that he found no wrongdoing in the Barry County election, We’re glad the prosecutor found nothing wrong with the Barry County election, so we’re hoping it ends very soon.

Published with permission of the American Independent Foundation.

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Michigan County Poll Clerks Are Sure Your Vote Will Count https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-poll-clerks-are-sure-your-vote-will-count/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-poll-clerks-are-sure-your-vote-will-count/ We don’t agree on much, politically. We have different philosophies and different visions for our country. But as Republican and Democrat clerks in Michigan, there’s one thing we unequivocally agree on: Our elections are safe, secure and, above all, sacred. As county clerks in a swing state, we have overseen elections where the candidates we […]]]>

We don’t agree on much, politically. We have different philosophies and different visions for our country. But as Republican and Democrat clerks in Michigan, there’s one thing we unequivocally agree on: Our elections are safe, secure and, above all, sacred.

As county clerks in a swing state, we have overseen elections where the candidates we support win and the candidates we support lose. But no matter what, our job never changes: we make sure every vote is counted and we report accurate results to the public. That’s how it works in America. But in recent years, the rise of a false narrative that our elections are “rigged” has caused some Americans to lose faith in the process. As election officials, we are determined and professionally obligated to rebuild it.

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How Michigan County Clerks Make Sure Your Vote is Counted and the Election is Secure https://blissfield.net/how-michigan-county-clerks-make-sure-your-vote-is-counted-and-the-election-is-secure/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 16:24:14 +0000 https://blissfield.net/how-michigan-county-clerks-make-sure-your-vote-is-counted-and-the-election-is-secure/ TOWNSHIP OF HARRISON, Mich. – In Michigan, 1,600 clerks run elections in 83 counties at once. This means that millions of votes are cast and counted. But it all starts with a single vote. “The clerks are really a belt and suspenders, we have substitutes,” said Adam Wit. Wit is the clerk of Township of […]]]>

TOWNSHIP OF HARRISON, Mich. – In Michigan, 1,600 clerks run elections in 83 counties at once.

This means that millions of votes are cast and counted. But it all starts with a single vote.

“The clerks are really a belt and suspenders, we have substitutes,” said Adam Wit.

Wit is the clerk of Township of Harrison and have been for 10 years. He is also president of the Michigan Association of Municipal Clerks.

“When you get your ballot it has a number at the top and everyone is a unique number for each constituency so we know we only give out one number one ballot or one number two ballot . You cannot bring your own ballot. We’re the only ones that have it,” Wit said.

After the ballot is filled out, it is routed to machines called tabulators. They read votes like a school scantron test and can even take photos to make sure registered candidates are counted. And this process is done – over and over and over and over again – until late at night, when the polls close and it’s time to get to work.

First, the box inside is unlocked making sure the seal on the tab stick is not broken. The stick is a USB key with a tamper-evident seal. This should be intact and match their records to the machine. Then they hit print. The machine spits out what amounts to an election reception time and date three times. One for the county board of canvassers, one for a county judge and one for the local clerk and everything is triple checked.

“If we had 100 voters, we know there’s going to be 100 ballots that have gone through the machine, the tabulator will tell us 100. The poll book will tell us 100. So we’re tying all of those numbers together to s’ ensure the count is valid,” Wit said.

After that it’s the ballot count, matching the number of ballots in the locked box inside the tabulator to the number of voters they counted that day for the number in the poll, each signed by a Republican and a Democrat.

The ballots are then stored, again under a signed padlock and sealed in a box or bag. This flash drive in its own tamper-evident sealed pouch is brought to the county clerk’s office. As Antoine Forlini‘Fishing Macomb County.

“He is led here. We get them, we put them in our secure server, which is not on the internet,” Forlini said. “We put it in our software and the reports go live and the media gets their numbers late at night.”

Macomb County would not let Local 4 show the server itself for voter safety reasons. But once those are in place, the county verifies the votes and returns the baton to the local clerk with a matching seal. The unofficial results rise and the solicitation or review process begins again for the next few weeks until the election is approved by the county and possibly the state. All designed as safes to ensure nothing was missed and everything was counted.

The clerks do not see having to explain the process as an inconvenience but as an opportunity to prove voter protection.

“I think we have a responsibility to do our job with this hanging over us. I think we have a responsibility to be transparent,” Forlini said.

“It’s a lack of information for people, so as clerks it’s our job to reach out to people and spread real information to be trusted resources for people, so we’re looking for an opportunity to share,” Wit said.

Copyright 2022 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All Rights Reserved.

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Proposition 2 changes too drastically for Michigan, county clerk says https://blissfield.net/proposition-2-changes-too-drastically-for-michigan-county-clerk-says/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:45:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/proposition-2-changes-too-drastically-for-michigan-county-clerk-says/ Polls have shown that nearly 80% of Michigan voters support showing photo ID to vote. Proposal 2 does indeed include a provision for voter ID verification, and the implication is that it will require all voters to present ID. It’s dishonest. In effect, Proposition 2 mimics Michigan’s current weak voter ID law by allowing a […]]]>

Polls have shown that nearly 80% of Michigan voters support showing photo ID to vote. Proposal 2 does indeed include a provision for voter ID verification, and the implication is that it will require all voters to present ID. It’s dishonest. In effect, Proposition 2 mimics Michigan’s current weak voter ID law by allowing a signed statement instead of photo ID, ensuring that no voter would have to show a piece of ID. identification to receive their ballot and count their vote. We should be strengthening Michigan’s voter ID law, not cementing it into the constitution!

Proposition 2 also allows corporations, special interests and the wealthy elite to help fund the election. The administration of elections is a core function of government, and only government should be responsible for funding it. Any other subsidy mechanism or program could call into question the real interest being served in the electoral process. Ever-changing election laws, advances in technology and ensuring security have strained our election budgets. However, private financing of public elections is not the solution; the solution is to keep federal, state and local governments on fire and demand sufficient funding for 21st century elections.

The most compelling reason to vote NO is this: Proposition 2 dismantles a crown jewel of checks and balances. Michigan has always bragged about not sending mail-in ballots to voters unless they submitted a request. Applications include voter signatures, which clerks verify against signatures in the voters file before even issuing a ballot. According to Proposition 2, with a single app, voters can automatically receive an absentee ballot for every election in the future. In 2020, Jocelyn Benson sent mail-in ballot requests to voters across the state, and the requests arrived at the homes of voters who hadn’t lived there in years. Imagine if those nominations were actually ballots! Eliminating this important safety measure is dangerous.

Proposal 2 contains troubling and costly additional provisions. The proposal is wrapped in sweet rhetoric, but don’t bite the bait. He is veiled as a “pro-voter”, an irony as he degrades law-abiding voters and jeopardizes the security and integrity of elections. Michigan voters deserve safe, transparent, fair and accurate elections. Vote NO on proposal 2.

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2020 Election Denialist Resurfaces in Michigan County Clerk’s Office | State https://blissfield.net/2020-election-denialist-resurfaces-in-michigan-county-clerks-office-state/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/2020-election-denialist-resurfaces-in-michigan-county-clerks-office-state/ DETROIT — A Michigan activist who promoted false claims that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from former President Donald Trump and who once live-streamed a protest outside Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s home has started working at the Macomb County Clerk’s Office. The hiring of Genevieve Peters in an office that helps administer local […]]]>

DETROIT — A Michigan activist who promoted false claims that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from former President Donald Trump and who once live-streamed a protest outside Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s home has started working at the Macomb County Clerk’s Office.

The hiring of Genevieve Peters in an office that helps administer local elections concerns some battleground county Democrats ahead of the Nov. 8 midterm vote. But Macomb County Clerk Anthony Forlini, a Republican, defended Peters, who he said was brought in around May.

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For the first time in 3 months, no county in Michigan has high levels of COVID https://blissfield.net/for-the-first-time-in-3-months-no-county-in-michigan-has-high-levels-of-covid/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 14:06:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/for-the-first-time-in-3-months-no-county-in-michigan-has-high-levels-of-covid/ None of Michigan’s 83 counties had high levels of coronavirus transmission in the latest assessment from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The state had 32 medium-risk and 51 low-risk counties as of Thursday, October 13. That’s an improvement from last week, when two counties – Delta and Gogebic – were at high […]]]>

None of Michigan’s 83 counties had high levels of coronavirus transmission in the latest assessment from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The state had 32 medium-risk and 51 low-risk counties as of Thursday, October 13. That’s an improvement from last week, when two counties – Delta and Gogebic – were at high risk and 34 at medium risk.

The CDC uses its community levels to determine COVID risk, placing counties in one of three buckets: low (green), medium (yellow), or high (orange). When a county enters the high transmission level, it is recommended that masks be worn indoors in public, regardless of vaccination status.

Michigan has had one or more counties in the orange for three months, dating back to mid-July. Four weeks ago, there were 14 such counties.

People with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask, regardless of where they live. Health officials continue to monitor a possible fall surge, but so far cases have generally remained constant since the start of summer.

Here is the latest map showing the community level for each county in Michigan. Tap or hover over a county to see details.

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

The CDC considers cases and hospitalizations when determining the risk of COVID for an area. The aim is to prevent serious illnesses and limit the pressure on hospitals.

For community levels, the CDC looks at three factors for each county: the percentage of staffed hospital beds occupied by COVID patients, COVID hospital admissions per capita, and COVID cases per capita.

A county is at a high level when there are 200 or more new cases per 100,000 in the past week and either (A) more than 10 new COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 or (B) when at least 10% of inpatient beds are occupied by COVID patients.

If hospitalizations are particularly high, even a county with low cases may be high, according to the CDC’s formula.

(Not all counties have hospitals, so each is assigned a health service area, a geographic region that contains at least one hospital. Counties receive the calculated metrics for the entire area, weighted by each county’s population (Example: Monroe The County Health Services area also includes the Toledo, Ohio area.)

Here’s more on where Michigan stands with COVID.

Michigan is reporting 1,408 cases a day over the past week

Daily reported COVID cases fell another 2.6% last week, bringing the seven-day average to a six-month low.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services reports COVID cases once a week. MDHHS announced 12,548 confirmed and probable cases this week.

Michigan has reported nearly 2.5 million confirmed COVID cases and more than 390,600 probable cases since the pandemic began. A case diagnosed by a doctor and/or an antigen test, but without a confirmatory PCR test, is classified as “probable”.

At this time last year, Michigan was reporting an average of 3,603 cases per day, although home testing was less common. People who self-administer a COVID test are less likely to report their case than those at clinics and other testing sites.

The chart below shows the seven-day average of new confirmed COVID cases throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

Michigan ranks 8th in the United States for new cases per capita

Michigan has had the eighth highest number of new COVID cases per capita over the past week among the 50 U.S. states, according to The New York Times. Michigan ranked 10th last week and eighth the week before.

The states with the highest COVID rates are Kentucky, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, New York and Maine. The states with the lowest reported COVID rates right now are Georgia, Arizona, Nevada, Louisiana and Texas.

For COVID hospitalizations per capita, Michigan ranks 10th this week. For COVID deaths per capita, Michigan was ranked seventh this week.

40 counties have seen the number of cases increase in the past seven days

Of Michigan’s 83 counties, 40 had more cases reported this week than last week, up from 27 counties on the rise a week ago.

Consult the database below to search/sort case totals by county. The graph also shows the percentage change from week to week and the seven-day average of cases per capita.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

13 Michigan counties most at risk for cases

Using the state health department’s five-level risk assessment, there were 13 counties at the highest risk level (E-level) for cases over the past week, compared to 14 counties there. a week ago and 23 the week before.

The five levels:

  • Level A: 7 to 19 cases per day per million inhabitants
  • Level B: 20 ​​to 39 cases per day per million
  • Level C: 40 to 69 cases per day per million
  • Level D: 70-149 cases per day per million
  • Level E: 150+ cases per day per million

The counties with the highest COVID rates this week were Ontonagon, Jackson, Macomb, Wayne and Iosco. The lowest COVID rates this week were in St. Joseph, Luce, Charlevoix and Schoolcraft counties.

The map below is shaded by the state’s six risk assessment levels from A to E. This is based on new cases reported per day and per million people from October 5-10.

Arrows on each county indicate whether new cases this week were up or down from the previous week. Place your cursor over a county to see the underlying data. (Tip: drag the map with your cursor to see the whole UP)

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

The total number of COVID cases does not tell the whole story. Home tests are often not reported, so they are not included in the data. This is why it is also essential to examine the percentage of positivity of the tests reported and the data on hospitalizations and deaths.

The average test positivity is 14.4%

On Monday, October 3, approximately 14.2% of reported COVID tests in Michigan came back positive, which was slightly lower than the seven-day average. Until recently, the positivity rate had been above 15% since early July.

Throughout the pandemic, the World Health Organization has considered substantial-level community transmission when positivity rates are above 5%. However, levels were likely hit by the move to more home testing.

Michigan’s rate peaked at 35% in January. It fell as low as 2% in early March before rising again.

The chart below shows the percentage of reported COVID-19 tests that came back positive throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

The highest positivity rates in Michigan this week were in Shiawassee, Missaukee, Crawford, Iosco, Kalkaska, Mason, Van Buren, Leelanau, Grand Traverse and Wexford counties. The lowest positivity rates were in Schoolcraft, Baraga, St. Joseph, Alcona, Dickinson, Charlevoix, Menominee, Keweenaw and Branch counties.

To see the COVID test positivity rate for your county, see the searchable table below.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

The interactive map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. Place your cursor over a county to see details.

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

Hospitals treating 1,055 adult patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19

Michigan had 1,055 adults with COVID in hospitals as of Wednesday, October 12. This is down from 1,090 the previous week.

There were also 40 children hospitalized with COVID in Michigan on Wednesday – up from 46 last week

Of this week’s COVID patients, 130 were in intensive care and 52 were on a ventilator.

Michigan reports 16 new COVID deaths per day over the past week

Michigan has averaged 16 COVID deaths per day over the past week, down slightly from 17 and 18 per day each of the previous two weeks.

During omicron’s peak in January, Michigan averaged more than 100 COVID deaths per day.

Michigan has had 35,456 confirmed COVID-19 deaths and 3,463 probable COVID deaths since the pandemic began. In other words, about one in every 285 Michigan residents has died of confirmed COVID.

Below is a graph illustrating the seven-day average of reported deaths throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

Vaccinations: 63.6% of residents received at least one dose

About 63.6% of Michigan residents have received at least one COVID vaccine, 58.7% have received the full original regimen and 36.7% have been boosted.

The omicron-specific COVID-19 booster is now available in Michigan from Pfizer and Moderna. At least 576,956 Michiganders have received the bivalent booster so far.

The new vaccines are licensed for use as a single booster dose, given at least two months after a previous COVID vaccine. Moderna’s shot is licensed for ages 18 and older, while Pfizer’s is for ages 5 and older. Below is a table that ranks counties from most vaccinated to least vaccinated.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

For more statewide data, visit MLive’s coronavirus data page.

To find a testing site near you, visit the state’s online test search, email COVID19@michigan.gov, or call 888-535-6136 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. .

If you have questions about COVID-19, please submit them to covidquestions@mlive.com to be considered for future MLive reporting.

Learn more about MLive:

Whitmer, Dixon offer different takes on Michigan’s path since pandemic in first debate

Prices up 8.2% as food and housing prices kept September inflation high

Michigan students may not be borrowing as much for college

Public universities in Michigan have lost 45,000 students since 2011. The situation is about to get worse.

Barry County and Metro Detroit are Michigan’s latest cases of monkeypox

]]>
For the first time in 3 months, no county in Michigan has high levels of COVID https://blissfield.net/for-the-first-time-in-3-months-no-county-in-michigan-has-high-levels-of-covid-2/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 14:06:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/for-the-first-time-in-3-months-no-county-in-michigan-has-high-levels-of-covid-2/ None of Michigan’s 83 counties had high levels of coronavirus transmission in the latest assessment from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The state had 32 medium-risk and 51 low-risk counties as of Thursday, October 13. That’s an improvement from last week, when two counties – Delta and Gogebic – were at high […]]]>

None of Michigan’s 83 counties had high levels of coronavirus transmission in the latest assessment from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The state had 32 medium-risk and 51 low-risk counties as of Thursday, October 13. That’s an improvement from last week, when two counties – Delta and Gogebic – were at high risk and 34 at medium risk.

The CDC uses its community levels to determine COVID risk, placing counties in one of three buckets: low (green), medium (yellow), or high (orange). When a county enters the high transmission level, it is recommended that masks be worn indoors in public, regardless of vaccination status.

Michigan has had one or more counties in the orange for three months, dating back to mid-July. Four weeks ago, there were 14 such counties.

People with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask, regardless of where they live. Health officials continue to monitor a possible fall surge, but so far cases have generally remained constant since the start of summer.

Here is the latest map showing the community level for each county in Michigan. Tap or hover over a county to see details.

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

The CDC considers cases and hospitalizations when determining the risk of COVID for an area. The aim is to prevent serious illnesses and limit the pressure on hospitals.

For community levels, the CDC looks at three factors for each county: the percentage of staffed hospital beds occupied by COVID patients, COVID hospital admissions per capita, and COVID cases per capita.

A county is at a high level when there are 200 or more new cases per 100,000 in the past week and either (A) more than 10 new COVID-19 hospital admissions per 100,000 or (B) when at least 10% of inpatient beds are occupied by COVID patients.

If hospitalizations are particularly high, even a county with low cases may be high, according to the CDC’s formula.

(Not all counties have hospitals, so each is assigned a health service area, a geographic region that contains at least one hospital. Counties receive the calculated metrics for the entire area, weighted by each county’s population (Example: Monroe The County Health Services area also includes the Toledo, Ohio area.)

Here’s more on where Michigan stands with COVID.

Michigan is reporting 1,408 cases a day over the past week

Daily reported COVID cases fell another 2.6% last week, bringing the seven-day average to a six-month low.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services reports COVID cases once a week. MDHHS announced 12,548 confirmed and probable cases this week.

Michigan has reported nearly 2.5 million confirmed COVID cases and more than 390,600 probable cases since the pandemic began. A case diagnosed by a doctor and/or an antigen test, but without a confirmatory PCR test, is classified as “probable”.

At this time last year, Michigan was reporting an average of 3,603 cases per day, although home testing was less common. People who self-administer a COVID test are less likely to report their case than those at clinics and other testing sites.

The chart below shows the seven-day average of new confirmed COVID cases throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

Michigan ranks 8th in the United States for new cases per capita

Michigan has had the eighth highest number of new COVID cases per capita over the past week among the 50 U.S. states, according to The New York Times. Michigan ranked 10th last week and eighth the week before.

The states with the highest COVID rates are Kentucky, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, New York and Maine. The states with the lowest reported COVID rates right now are Georgia, Arizona, Nevada, Louisiana and Texas.

For COVID hospitalizations per capita, Michigan ranks 10th this week. For COVID deaths per capita, Michigan was ranked seventh this week.

40 counties have seen the number of cases increase in the past seven days

Of Michigan’s 83 counties, 40 had more cases reported this week than last week, up from 27 counties on the rise a week ago.

Consult the database below to search/sort case totals by county. The graph also shows the percentage change from week to week and the seven-day average of cases per capita.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

13 Michigan counties most at risk for cases

Using the state health department’s five-level risk assessment, there were 13 counties at the highest risk level (E-level) for cases over the past week, compared to 14 counties there. a week ago and 23 the week before.

The five levels:

  • Level A: 7 to 19 cases per day per million inhabitants
  • Level B: 20 ​​to 39 cases per day per million
  • Level C: 40 to 69 cases per day per million
  • Level D: 70-149 cases per day per million
  • Level E: 150+ cases per day per million

The counties with the highest COVID rates this week were Ontonagon, Jackson, Macomb, Wayne and Iosco. The lowest COVID rates this week were in St. Joseph, Luce, Charlevoix and Schoolcraft counties.

The map below is shaded by the state’s six risk assessment levels from A to E. This is based on new cases reported per day and per million people from October 5-10.

Arrows on each county indicate whether new cases this week were up or down from the previous week. Place your cursor over a county to see the underlying data. (Tip: drag the map with your cursor to see the whole UP)

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

The total number of COVID cases does not tell the whole story. Home tests are often not reported, so they are not included in the data. This is why it is also essential to examine the percentage of positivity of the tests reported and the data on hospitalizations and deaths.

The average test positivity is 14.4%

On Monday, October 3, approximately 14.2% of reported COVID tests in Michigan came back positive, which was slightly lower than the seven-day average. Until recently, the positivity rate had been above 15% since early July.

Throughout the pandemic, the World Health Organization has considered substantial-level community transmission when positivity rates are above 5%. However, levels were likely hit by the move to more home testing.

Michigan’s rate peaked at 35% in January. It fell as low as 2% in early March before rising again.

The chart below shows the percentage of reported COVID-19 tests that came back positive throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

The highest positivity rates in Michigan this week were in Shiawassee, Missaukee, Crawford, Iosco, Kalkaska, Mason, Van Buren, Leelanau, Grand Traverse and Wexford counties. The lowest positivity rates were in Schoolcraft, Baraga, St. Joseph, Alcona, Dickinson, Charlevoix, Menominee, Keweenaw and Branch counties.

To see the COVID test positivity rate for your county, see the searchable table below.

(Don’t see the database? Click here.)

The interactive map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. Place your cursor over a county to see details.

(Don’t see the map? Click here.)

Hospitals treating 1,055 adult patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19

Michigan had 1,055 adults with COVID in hospitals as of Wednesday, October 12. This is down from 1,090 the previous week.

There were also 40 children hospitalized with COVID in Michigan on Wednesday – up from 46 last week

Of this week’s COVID patients, 130 were in intensive care and 52 were on a ventilator.

Michigan reports 16 new COVID deaths per day over the past week

Michigan has averaged 16 COVID deaths per day over the past week, down slightly from 17 and 18 per day each of the previous two weeks.

During omicron’s peak in January, Michigan averaged more than 100 COVID deaths per day.

Michigan has had 35,456 confirmed COVID-19 deaths and 3,463 probable COVID deaths since the pandemic began. In other words, about one in every 285 Michigan residents has died of confirmed COVID.

Below is a graph illustrating the seven-day average of reported deaths throughout the pandemic.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

Vaccinations: 63.6% of residents received at least one dose

About 63.6% of Michigan residents have received at least one COVID vaccine, 58.7% have received the full original regimen and 36.7% have been boosted.

The omicron-specific COVID-19 booster is now available in Michigan from Pfizer and Moderna. At least 576,956 Michiganders have received the bivalent booster so far.

The new vaccines are licensed for use as a single booster dose, given at least two months after a previous COVID vaccine. Moderna’s shot is licensed for ages 18 and older, while Pfizer’s is for ages 5 and older. Below is a table that ranks counties from most vaccinated to least vaccinated.

(Don’t see the table? Click here.)

For more statewide data, visit MLive’s coronavirus data page.

To find a testing site near you, visit the state’s online test search, email COVID19@michigan.gov, or call 888-535-6136 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. .

If you have questions about COVID-19, please submit them to covidquestions@mlive.com to be considered for future MLive reporting.

Learn more about MLive:

Whitmer, Dixon offer different takes on Michigan’s path since pandemic in first debate

Prices up 8.2% as food and housing prices kept September inflation high

Michigan students may not be borrowing so much for college

Public universities in Michigan have lost 45,000 students since 2011. The situation is about to get worse.

Barry County and Metro Detroit are Michigan’s latest cases of monkeypox

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