Michigan county – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 17:26:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Michigan county – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 In only one Michigan county should people wear masks, CDC says https://blissfield.net/in-only-one-michigan-county-should-people-wear-masks-cdc-says/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:06:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/in-only-one-michigan-county-should-people-wear-masks-cdc-says/ Only Iron County on the Upper Peninsula is at a high community level of COVID-19 this week, which means people there should mask up indoors and in public, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States. A week earlier, there were 11 counties in Northern Michigan and UP at such […]]]>

Only Iron County on the Upper Peninsula is at a high community level of COVID-19 this week, which means people there should mask up indoors and in public, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States. A week earlier, there were 11 counties in Northern Michigan and UP at such a level.

Delta, Almost Isle, Montmorency, and Alpena counties have since moved from high-level orange to low-level green. Manistee, Benzie, Leelanau, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska and Antrim counties went from orange to mid-level yellow.

Fifteen counties are yellow. All except Monroe County in the Southeast are in northern Michigan or UP, reports the CDC, which is reviewing recent hospitalizations and new case information to update its card every Thursday evening. Sixty-seven counties, almost all of the Lower Peninsula, are green.

That means people in those areas must wear masks indoors and in public, says the CDC, which updates its map weekly by Thursday evening.

RELATED: A summer break from COVID? : Michigan data for Thursday, June 23

Only at high level orange does the CDC recommend universal masking indoors and in public.

However, people with symptoms, a positive test, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask regardless of where they live, the CDC says, and people at high risk for severe illness could need to take extra precautions in case of strong COVID-19 commons.

To see how the CDC rated your county, check out the interactive map below. Tap or hover over a county to see the underlying data.

Don’t see the map above? Click here.

The CDC relaxed its mask guidelines in February, when the worst of the Omicron wave was behind the country, moving from reviewing only cases and positive tests to reviewing cases and hospitalizations. The idea is to prevent serious illnesses and limit the pressure on hospitals.

A county is at a high level when there are more than 200 new cases per 100,000 people in the past seven days and 10 or more new COVID-19 admissions per 100,000 people or 10% of hospitalized patients, staffed beds in staff are occupied by COVID patients on average last week; or fewer than 200 new cases per 100,000 people and 10 or more new COVID-19 admissions per capita in the last seven days or 15% or more of inpatient hospital beds are occupied by COVID patients on average daily in the course of the last week. (Not all counties have hospitals, so each is assigned a health service area, a geographic region that contains at least one hospital. Counties receive the calculated metrics for the entire area, weighted by based on the population of each county. The community level is determined by the higher of the two hospital metrics.)

COVID-19 measures have been declining in Michigan for five weeks.

New COVID cases fell another 14.3% this week, with the state reporting 1,588 confirmed cases per day on Tuesday when the state health department gave its weekly update.

Hospitalizations are still down, as they have been for weeks. The number of pediatric patients, however, is on the rise this week. Patients in intensive care and on ventilators this week were little changed from last week.

As of Tuesday, hospitals across the state were treating 750 adult patients and 27 pediatric patients with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19. This includes 93 adult patients in intensive care and 37 on ventilators.

As of June 15, hospitals across the state were treating 836 adult patients and 19 pediatric patients with confirmed or suspected cases. This included 39 patients on ventilators and 98 adults in intensive care.

Michigan is doing better than other states. Florida, New Mexico and California had the highest new cases per capita in the past seven days in the continental United States, according to New York Times data. Michigan was just outside the top 30.

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Abortion dueling rallies are expected Friday at Michigan’s Capitol after Roe’s cancellation

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Michigan County Joins Ban on Private Election Financing https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-joins-ban-on-private-election-financing/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:53:10 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-joins-ban-on-private-election-financing/ Livingston County, Michigan this week became the latest jurisdiction in the nation and the first in its state to ban private funding of election administration. The move came after good government advocates grew furious that a group of Mark Zuckerberg-funded activists, the left-leaning Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL), flooded election offices in Democratic […]]]>

Livingston County, Michigan this week became the latest jurisdiction in the nation and the first in its state to ban private funding of election administration.

The move came after good government advocates grew furious that a group of Mark Zuckerberg-funded activists, the left-leaning Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL), flooded election offices in Democratic Party strongholds. Michigan with millions of dollars in an apparent effort. increase voter turnout for this party in 2020.

Critics say Zuckerberg, the billionaire Facebook founder and Democratic activist, and his wife Priscilla Chan gave the money in an effort to influence the 2020 election.

Critics say the grants achieved Zuckerberg’s goal.

In 2016, then-Republican candidate Donald Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in Michigan by 10,704 votes. But in 2020, Democrat Joe Biden beat Trump in the state by 154,188 votes, according to official results reported by Ballotpedia.

Critics say the help provided by CTCL in Detroit, Benton Harbor, Muskegon and other heavily Democratic jurisdictions in the state may have put Biden on top.

On June 13, the Livingston County Board of Commissioners voted unanimously to ban the acceptance of unregulated funds to fund the election, a move that attorney Erick Kaardal says will strengthen the integrity of the election.

Kaardal, a special counsel for the Thomas More Society, a national public interest law firm that protects religious freedom and maintains an election integrity practice, said he provided commissioners with an analysis of the resolution before they don’t vote on it.

Livingston County sits between Detroit and Lansing, the state capital.

The committee’s vote brings Michigan one step closer to a national movement to ban ‘dark money’, or political spending intended to influence voters, where the donor is undisclosed and the source of the money is unknown. , did he declare.

Walworth County in neighboring Wisconsin has become the first local government in that state to ban the acceptance of private funds or grants for use in administering elections, as reported by The Epoch Times.

“In the past 18 months, 20 states have enacted laws prohibiting private money to administer public elections,” Kaardal said in a statement in which he identified Texas, Florida, Ohio and Arizona. , among those who currently have such laws in force.

He said the legislatures of six other states had passed such legislation, but governors had vetoed it.

“This is a victory for voters in Livingston County and will hopefully pave the way for other local governments to optimize election integrity in their areas,” Kaardal said.

“When there is no insistence on election integrity from the top, it is up to counties and municipalities to protect the right of voters entrusted to them.”

“Because Michigan’s executive branch was unwilling to keep private money out of the election, it’s incumbent on cities and counties to protect themselves from outside interference from illegal money sources,” Kaardal said.

“People understand that the right to vote is the cornerstone of a free society and that biased intervention by those who influence the outcome with their dirty money must not be tolerated.”

The Epoch Times has asked CTCL for comment but had not received a response as of press time.

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Matthew Vadum is an award-winning investigative journalist and recognized expert on left-wing activism.

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Michigan County Sheriff’s Office says it’s already out of gas money | Michigan News | Detroit https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriffs-office-says-its-already-out-of-gas-money-michigan-news-detroit/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriffs-office-says-its-already-out-of-gas-money-michigan-news-detroit/ Click to enlarge Shutterstock Even the police feel the pain of inflation. The price of gas is too high. According to AAA, the average cost of gas today in Michigan is $5.21. Apparently we’re not the only ones feeling the pain at the pump, an agency in Michigan’s Bureau of Law Enforcement has adjusted its […]]]>
Click to enlarge

Shutterstock

Even the police feel the pain of inflation.

The price of gas is too high.

According to AAA, the average cost of gas today in Michigan is $5.21.

Apparently we’re not the only ones feeling the pain at the pump, an agency in Michigan’s Bureau of Law Enforcement has adjusted its operations due to rising prices.

Isabella County Sheriff Michael Main took to the county’s Facebook page to alert residents that the county’s fuel budget has already run out and deputies have been instructed to handle as many situations as possible by telephone in order to reserve fuel.

Click to enlarge A message from Isabella Sherrif's county office.  - SCREENSHOT/FACEBOOK

Screenshot/Facebook

A message from Isabella Sherrif’s county office.

Comments on the Facebook post were limited, but one Facebook user asked “Will cops be sent to a certain call?”

The sheriff’s office responded “Absolutely, we will only try to handle phone calls that are not in progress or that require a deputy to answer.”

According to the United States Census Bureau, Isabella County has an estimated population of 64,000. The county is home to Mount Pleasant, where Central Michigan University is located.

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Michigan County Commissioner’s recall leads to reversal of party control – Ballotpedia News https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-commissioners-recall-leads-to-reversal-of-party-control-ballotpedia-news/ Mon, 09 May 2022 22:54:03 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-commissioners-recall-leads-to-reversal-of-party-control-ballotpedia-news/ William Bunek (R) was removed as Leelanau County Commissioner in Michigan in a recall election on May 3, 2022. Bunek lost the seat with 55% of the vote cast in favor of recall. Lois Bahle (D) was elected alternate candidate alongside the recall. Bahle’s election changed the majority of the board from Republican to Democrat. […]]]>

William Bunek (R) was removed as Leelanau County Commissioner in Michigan in a recall election on May 3, 2022. Bunek lost the seat with 55% of the vote cast in favor of recall. Lois Bahle (D) was elected alternate candidate alongside the recall. Bahle’s election changed the majority of the board from Republican to Democrat.

Recall supporters criticized Bunek for statements he made at a county board meeting on Sept. 14, 2021. At that meeting, Bunek and three other Republicans on the board recommended reducing the mileage of the board to zero. early childhood services adopted by voters in November 2019. According to the Traverse City Eagle of Records, “Bunek said at the time that the United States was a constitutional republic and when voters make a bad decision, the county council is there to make sure it doesn’t continue.” Prior to the recall, Bunek held the seat for 14 years.

Bunek appealed the factual nature of the recall request to the 13th Circuit Court, saying he believed his statements were misrepresented. The appeal was rejected and supporters of the recall were able to collect 663 signatures to send the recall to a vote.

There were 15 recall attempts against 33 county commissioners in 2022. Of these, nine are in progress, 19 did not go to a vote, one resulted in a resignation, two were approved, one was defeated and one is on the ballot in May. 2022.

There have already been more recall efforts against county commissioners in 2022 than in the first half of 2021. Between January and June 2021, 12 county commissioners were targets of recall efforts. As of May 9, 2022, 33 county commissioners have been the target of recall efforts.

Further reading:




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Northern Michigan County is now at a high level of COVID; residents there should wear a mask, CDC says https://blissfield.net/northern-michigan-county-is-now-at-a-high-level-of-covid-residents-there-should-wear-a-mask-cdc-says/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/northern-michigan-county-is-now-at-a-high-level-of-covid-residents-there-should-wear-a-mask-cdc-says/ Grand Traverse County in northwest Michigan is now at an elevated level of COVID-19, which means there is potential for strain on the health care system, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the United States. Residents should wear masks indoors and in public and on public transportation, and people at high risk […]]]>

Grand Traverse County in northwest Michigan is now at an elevated level of COVID-19, which means there is potential for strain on the health care system, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the United States.

Residents should wear masks indoors and in public and on public transportation, and people at high risk of serious illness should consider taking extra precautions, the CDC advises.

Michigan hasn’t had a county high since March, and many have long since stopped wearing face coverings at school, grocery stores and other crowded places. As the omicron’s winter swell subsided, the CDC adjusted its assessment in February, looking at data from regional hospitals instead of just new cases per capita or percentages of positive tests.

Grand Traverse County had 12 new admissions of confirmed COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people in the seven days ending Tuesday, May 3. It also recorded more than 200 new cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 people, during the same period.

RELATED: 7-day average of new confirmed COVID cases up 32% this week in Michigan

Additionally, Clinton, Livingston, Wayne, Macomb and Monroe counties this week went from low green to yellow. Washtenaw and Oakland counties remain yellow. Southeast Michigan has been hardest hit by the state’s recent spike in COVID-19 cases, but most areas are seeing increases. Marquette County and the small county of Keweenaw in the Upper Peninsula were also upgraded this week from low to medium levels.

Only at the orange level does the CDC recommend people wear masks. People with symptoms, testing positive, or exposure to someone with COVID-19 should wear a mask regardless of where they live, according to the CDC.

To see how the CDC rated your county, check out the interactive map below. Tap or hover over a county to see the underlying data.

Don’t see the map above? Click here.

Looking at new cases per 100,000 residents in the seven days ending Wednesday, the last day Michigan updated its numbers, Washtenaw, Oakland, Wayne, Macomb, Livingston, Marquette and Monroe counties were all in the top 10.

Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, Washtenaw and Wayne counties were close to meeting the high level criteria. They were seeing 9.6 new confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted to hospitals per 100,000 people in the seven days ending Tuesday. If the rate rises to 10, they will be orange, assuming their COVID-19 rates remain the same or increase.

RELATED: Spring surge overtakes metro Detroit: Michigan COVID data for Thursday, May 5

The northeastern part of the country continues to see the highest daily average of cases per capita. Rhode Island, Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New York and New Jersey lead the nation. Maine, New York, Vermont, Delaware and Washington, DC also had some of the highest hospitalization rates in the United States.

In Michigan, hospitals were about 79% capacity at the start of this week. Munson Medical Center in Traverse City had about 79% of its beds occupied.

As of Wednesday, hospitals across the state were treating 708 adult and 29 pediatric patients with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19. Thirty-two are on ventilators and 94 adults are in intensive care.

On April 27, there were 604 adult patients and 30 pediatric patients with confirmed or suspected cases. This included 28 on ventilators and 78 adults in intensive care.

Meanwhile, about 12.4% of tests were positive for SARS-CoV-2 in the seven days ending Wednesday. The previous week, 8.8% of tests were positive.

The idea is to dial in prevention strategies when communities are experiencing severe illness and scale them back when the situation is more stable, the CDC said of its community COVID assessments.

Not every county in Michigan or the United States has a hospital, so each is assigned a Health Service Area, a geographic region that contains at least one hospital. Counties in each division are assigned the metrics calculated for the entire area and weighted by each county’s population, a CDC spokesperson said earlier.

Michigan has 83 counties and 25 health service areas, three of which extend beyond state lines, according to the CDC.

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If Roe leaves, some Michigan county prosecutors vow not to prosecute abortion cases https://blissfield.net/if-roe-leaves-some-michigan-county-prosecutors-vow-not-to-prosecute-abortion-cases/ Fri, 06 May 2022 00:59:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/if-roe-leaves-some-michigan-county-prosecutors-vow-not-to-prosecute-abortion-cases/ The United States Supreme Court appears poised to overturn Roe v Wade and with it, the constitutional right to abortion. If and when that happens, abortion would become illegal in Michigan. This is because the state still has a 1931 law that prohibits abortion in almost all cases except when the mother’s life is in […]]]>

The United States Supreme Court appears poised to overturn Roe v Wade and with it, the constitutional right to abortion.

If and when that happens, abortion would become illegal in Michigan. This is because the state still has a 1931 law that prohibits abortion in almost all cases except when the mother’s life is in danger.

But seven Michigan county prosecutors have publicly said they will not prosecute abortion cases.

In an open letter dated April 7, prosecutors – Karen McDonald of Oakland County, Carol Siemon of Ingham County, Eli Savit of Washtenaw County, David Leyton of Genesee County, Kym Worthy of Wayne County, Matthew Wiese of Marquette County and Jeffrey Getting of Kalamazoo County – wrote:

“Michigan’s anti-abortion laws were written and passed in 1931. There were no women serving in the Michigan legislature. These archaic laws are unconstitutionally and dangerously vague, leaving open the possibility of criminalizing doctors, nurses , anesthesiologists, health care providers, office receptionists – virtually anyone who performs or assists in performing these medical procedures.Even the patient themselves could face criminal liability under these laws.

“We believe these laws conflict with our oath to uphold the constitutions of the United States and Michigan and to act in the best interests of the health and safety of our communities,” prosecutors continued. . “We cannot and will not support the criminalization of reproductive freedom or the creation of dangerous and untenable situations for health care providers and those seeking abortions in our communities. Instead, we will continue to dedicate our limited resources to the prosecution of serious crimes and the pursuit of justice for all.”

Washtenaw County District Attorney Eli Savit said prosecutors have discretion to issue charges. Sometimes it’s because they think the evidence is missing. “But there are also cases where prosecutors simply refuse to charge in the interests of justice, because we are responsible for making that decision,” he said. “And we elect prosecutors for a reason.”

On May 3, Savit and the six other prosecutors also filed motions in support of Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s lawsuit. He is asking the Michigan Supreme Court to rule that the 1931 law violates the equal protection and due process clauses of the state constitution. All seven are among 13 defendants named in the lawsuit, serving as prosecutors in Michigan counties where abortions are currently performed.

In their motion, prosecutors note that the law would have a “chilling effect.” Even in counties “where prosecutors aren’t inclined to prosecute abortion, ‘criminal’ abortion cases could still be investigated by law enforcement if [the 1931 law] comes back into force,” they wrote in the motion. Worse, they said, people could still be arrested for abortions — even in counties where prosecutors would typically deny such cases.

“Put bluntly: a storm is brewing,” the motion continued, urging the court to act quickly.

“A cloud of uncertainty and criminality hangs over the exercise of a right expressly protected by the American Constitution for half a century. Michigan residents, including those in the counties of defendants’ attorneys, deserve clarification as to the existence and scope of fundamental constitutional rights. And they deserve it now, before anyone faces the prospect of criminal liability for exercising their rights.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said she also won’t prosecute abortion cases while she remains in office. But Nessel also acknowledged that she couldn’t stop elected county prosecutors from bringing such cases.

In addition to Whitmer’s lawsuit, reproductive rights activists led by Planned Parenthood and the ACLU of Michigan are also collecting petition signatures for a ballot measure that, if successful, would enshrine abortion and other reproductive rights. in the state constitution.

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Michigan County Employees Accused of Embezzling $1.7 Million to Buy and Resell Nearly 600 Generators – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-employees-accused-of-embezzling-1-7-million-to-buy-and-resell-nearly-600-generators-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Wed, 04 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-employees-accused-of-embezzling-1-7-million-to-buy-and-resell-nearly-600-generators-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ County workers charged with embezzling $1.7 million to buy and resell nearly 600 generators Wayne County Roads Division employees Kevin Gunn and John L. Gibson face multiple charges, including conspiracy to commit and theft from federal programs. (DTM) WAYNE COUNTY, Mich. — Two Michigan County employees face federal charges after prosecutors say they embezzled more […]]]>

County workers charged with embezzling $1.7 million to buy and resell nearly 600 generators Wayne County Roads Division employees Kevin Gunn and John L. Gibson face multiple charges, including conspiracy to commit and theft from federal programs. (DTM)

WAYNE COUNTY, Mich. — Two Michigan County employees face federal charges after prosecutors say they embezzled more than $1.7 million in state funds to buy and resell equipment, including nearly 600 generators.

>> Read more trending news

According to MLive.com and the Detroit Free Press, authorities on Tuesday arrested Wayne County Roads Division employees Kevin Gunn, 64, and John L. Gibson, 54, on charges of conspiracy to commit and federal program theft, money laundering and wire theft. , the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Michigan said in a news release.

Officials said the alleged scheme, which also involved other employees and vendors, took place from January 2019 to August 2021.

“Gunn solicited approved Wayne County vendors to purchase generators and other electrical equipment from local retailers on behalf of Wayne County,” federal prosecutors said in the statement. “Vendors would then submit invoices for those items to Wayne County. In order to cover up the fraudulent scheme, Gunn ordered the vendors to falsify the invoices they submitted to the Roads Division and list the items the vendors were authorized to sell to the county under their contracts, rather than the items. generators and electrical equipment that they were illegally. acquired at Gunn’s request.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said Highways Division employees would “approve and then pay each vendor’s bill with taxpayer funds.” The county receives more than $20 million in federal funding each year for its roads, according to the release.

“After these fraudulent purchases were vetted and approved by Roads Division employees, Gibson and Gunn took possession of the equipment which was resold on the internet and social media for personal use,” the statement read. .

Prosecutors said the purchases included 596 generators and other equipment, such as lawn mowers, backpack blowers and chainsaws.

“The purchase of these items was not authorized by any vendor contract with Wayne County and the items were never supplied or used by Wayne County,” the statement said. “The total value of equipment purchased under the program was approximately $1.7 million in public funds.”

If convicted, Gunn and Gibson face decades in prison and up to $1 million in fines, according to the statement. The Free Press could not reach the men’s lawyers for comment.

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A Michigan county is making millions from recycling. It could become a model state. https://blissfield.net/a-michigan-county-is-making-millions-from-recycling-it-could-become-a-model-state/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/a-michigan-county-is-making-millions-from-recycling-it-could-become-a-model-state/ HARBOR SPRINGS, MI — It all started in 1990 with two recycling drop-off sites in the most northwest county at the tip of the Lower Peninsula, funded by a small two-year fee. Today, Emmet County’s high-tech recycling program has become a million-dollar revenue stream for the community of some 33,000 residents, selling thousands of tons […]]]>

HARBOR SPRINGS, MI — It all started in 1990 with two recycling drop-off sites in the most northwest county at the tip of the Lower Peninsula, funded by a small two-year fee.

Today, Emmet County’s high-tech recycling program has become a million-dollar revenue stream for the community of some 33,000 residents, selling thousands of tons of recyclables to Michigan businesses. and the Great Lakes region to make new products. They even found a way to recycle plastic shopping bags.

Experts say the three-decade-old program in the north serves as a model for what a package of 8 bills pending in the state legislature could do to help Michigan counties find ways recycle more, landfill less waste and develop breakthroughs in growing circular. savings for recyclable materials and compostable organic materials.

“They have demonstrated that public investment in this type of infrastructure pays off – yields valuable public services, as well as 90% of the materials they collect through their recycling programs are actually sold to companies around the world. Michigan,” Kerrin said. O’Brien, executive director of the nonprofit Michigan Recycling Coalition.

Inside the Harbor Springs facility, a robotic arm rapidly sweeps a moving conveyor belt and rips off high-grade plastics, glass and aluminum, depositing them in sorted bins. The stream of mixed containers circulates again and again until the robot removes all recyclable items at a rate of 90 picks per minute; another line of materials in a separate room is where workers hand pick papers, boxes and bags from a moving conveyor belt.

The system is the culmination of years of investment in a program that serves a multi-county region and which officials say has built a local culture of active recycling in homes, businesses and public places.

Michigan’s statewide recycling rate lags much of the country at 19%, and increasing participation would ultimately reduce overall carbon emissions, moving closer to newly set climate goals. established by the state. Science shows that greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane trap heat in the atmosphere and lead to global warming and climate change.

Rules about what can be recycled in Michigan vary depending on whether communities or private companies set up programs and what materials they choose to accept. Some places only accept certain plastics, others only brown cardboard, and some communities offer no access to recycling.

The difference between recycling efforts in Emmet County and elsewhere in Michigan is a matter of longevity and investment in both recycling infrastructure and long-term relationships with companies that reuse materials. Latex paint, used mattresses and fluorescent light bulbs have even found new uses, officials said.

“The people at the time who were running Emmet County were very forward-thinking in trying to encourage recycling,” said Andi Tolzdorf, program director. “They put recycling into their solid waste management plan, so from the beginning, Emmet County intended to recycle.”

The Harbor Springs facility serves as both a waste transfer station through which waste is sent to a contracted landfill, as well as a dual-stream recycling center. A county ordinance requires all household trash to pass through the facility, and all trash haulers pay the same rate for landfilling trash.

“Recycling is free for residents. Garbage is not, so there is a natural incentive to recycle. So that in itself has really given residents a kind of reason to recycle — to buy for recycling,” Tolzdorf said.

Statistics show that in 2020, the facility processed 13,378 tons of recyclables which were baled and loaded into tractor-trailers, then shipped and sold to a list of businesses for use. The materials become jugs of laundry detergent, planters, water bottles, cereal boxes, and even toilet paper, among other new products.

Most of the companies that buy recycled raw materials from Emmet County are in Michigan or other parts of the Great Lakes region.

The aluminum goes to a scrap service in Gaylord; Plastics No 1 and 2 go to a company in Dundee to make plastic pellets later made into detergent and water bottles; paperboard and boxboard are destined for a kraft paper mill in the Upper Peninsula and a food packaging manufacturer in Kalamazoo, among others; cartons and paper cups go to a tissue manufacturer in Cheboygan; engine oil is re-refined at Saginaw; the glass goes to a Chicago-based company to make bottles, insulators and abrasives; electronic devices are sent to a dismantling center in Wisconsin; and more places for other materials.

Program organizers even managed to find a place in Virginia that buys truckloads of plastic bags and bales of film — a notoriously difficult material to manage because it can tangle sorting machines. Plastic bags are transformed into composite wood for decking.

Tolzdorf said they make sure everything Emmet County Recycling accepts “is recyclable and is recycled.” They don’t take anything that doesn’t have a strong market, which she says doesn’t mean polystyrene.

“Recyclables are all based on the commodity market, so some years it’s high, some years it’s low. In 2020 we earned just over $500,000 from our sale of recyclables, and in 2021 we earned over $1 million,” Tolzdorf said.

“It shows that the markets are definitely changing. They were very low in 2020; they’ve rebounded to a five-year high in 2021. So we can’t base all of our financials on the sale of recyclables, but when they’re good, they’re good and they carry us, and when they don’t are not sometimes the transfer station will have to transport us and transport our finances.

The county’s waste transfer station handled nearly 125,000 cubic yards of household trash in 2020 for nearly $2.8 million in revenue.

Tolzdorf said the robotic sorting machine added in 2020 increased labor efficiency by 60% and increased capture of recyclables by 11%. This led to several of the program’s temporary contract workers being hired into full-time jobs with county benefits.

A multi-year, bipartisan effort under the last and current administration to revamp Michigan’s solid waste laws resulted in a package of legislation designed to improve the recycling, composting, and reuse of materials. The bills passed the State House in the spring of 2021, but have since stalled in the Senate without any discussion or committee hearings.

Several state-generated reports have investigated the issue and estimate that Michigan residents collectively pay more than $1 billion each year to manage their waste. In this stream of household waste, $600 million worth of recyclable materials are lost to landfills each year.

Part of the pending legislation would require counties to update their existing solid waste management plans to modernized materials management plans, establishing recycling benchmarks and fostering regional collaboration for recycling and composting centers. sites. The state would provide grants for these planning efforts.

Liz Browne, director of the materials management division for the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, said Marquette and Emmet counties are good examples of regional efforts. to provide services. Other Michigan communities could also develop strong recycling and composting programs that would benefit both the economy and the environment, she said.

“Putting something back for reuse has less impact than starting with virgin materials. If we are successful in generating the materials in Michigan and having markets for them in Michigan, we will significantly reduce our transportation impacts,” Browne said.

Browne and O’Brien said some Michigan companies can’t get enough recycled raw materials within state lines. They have to buy these materials from other states and even from Canada.

Capturing more recyclables from the waste stream in Michigan would absolutely benefit companies that rely on purchasing post-consumer materials for their own productions, said Karl Hatopp, supply chain manager for TABB. Packaging Solutions, based in Dundee. He said Emmet County has been selling plastics from Operations Nos. 1 and 2 for 20 years, and they also began purchasing raw materials from recycling centers in Marquette and Ann Arbor.

Recyclable plastics are broken down into a type of post-consumer resin or “pellets,” Hatopp said, then sold to manufacturers in Westland, and others in Ohio and Illinois, where they are made into products like than jugs of laundry detergent and Absopure water. bottles.

“The more material we can sell (inside) Michigan, the better off we are,” he said. “If we could buy more in Michigan, we could buy less in, say, California, Texas or Winnipeg.”

The company works with other Dundee companies from the recycling industry. One is Clean Tech Incorporated, where Hatopp said he worked for decades.

“Clean Tech started with four employees and we are now at over 150. So, really, it’s an achievement,” he said. “The more we recycle, the more jobs we create here in the state of Michigan that stay in the state of Michigan. So as far as we’re concerned, it’s good to increase recycling.

Among the goals of the new MI Healthy Climate Plan are increasing recycling rates to at least 45% and halving food waste by 2030. These measures are among the ways the plan calls for the Michigan to achieve a carbon neutral economy by 2050. .

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Contagious bird flu detected in another Michigan county https://blissfield.net/contagious-bird-flu-detected-in-another-michigan-county/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:13:55 +0000 https://blissfield.net/contagious-bird-flu-detected-in-another-michigan-county/ Following an investigation by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), the Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory detected the presence of avian influenza highly pathogen (HPAI) in a non-commercial backyard poultry flock in County Wexford. This latest HPAI finding highlights the continued high risk of the disease in Michigan and underscores […]]]>

Following an investigation by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), the Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory detected the presence of avian influenza highly pathogen (HPAI) in a non-commercial backyard poultry flock in County Wexford. This latest HPAI finding highlights the continued high risk of the disease in Michigan and underscores the need for bird owners to maintain vigilance in protecting their flocks.

HPAI is a highly contagious virus that can be spread in a variety of ways from flock to flock, including through wild birds, contact with infected poultry, equipment, and on the clothing and footwear of healers. To protect other flocks in Michigan, premises are currently under quarantine and birds will be depopulated to prevent the spread of disease.

The flock contained about 60 birds of various species.

“Even though temperatures have cooled, wild birds continue to migrate and spread the virus. The best strategy we have against HPAI is prevention,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Nora Wineland. “Backyard and commercial flock owners should do everything possible to keep wild birds and their germs away from domestic flocks. MDARD continues to respond quickly to all suspected cases of HPAI to minimize the impact of the disease.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these HPAI detections do not present an immediate public health concern. No human cases of these avian influenza viruses have been detected in the United States.

In addition, no HPAI-infected birds or bird products will enter the commercial food chain. As a reminder, people are encouraged to exercise caution when choosing foods for themselves and their families, and to handle and cook all poultry and eggs properly.

Whether it’s a few backyard birds or a large commercial flock, following a few key steps is fundamental to protecting the health and vitality of Michigan domestic birds:

  • Prevent contact between domestic and wild birds by bringing them indoors or ensuring their outdoor area is fully enclosed.
  • Wash your hands before and after handling birds and when moving between different barns.
  • Disinfect boots and other equipment when moving between barns.
  • Do not share equipment or other supplies between co-ops or other farms.
  • Clean and disinfect equipment and other supplies between uses. If it cannot be disinfected, throw it away.
  • Use of well or municipal water as drinking water for birds.
  • Store poultry feed in a safe place to ensure that there is no contact between the feed/feed ingredients and wild birds or rodents.

MDARD continues to work diligently with local, state, and federal partners to respond quickly to reports of sick or dead domestic birds to best mitigate the spread of HPAI and ensure awareness.

Reporting of possible cases

For domestic birds

Owners and keepers of domestic birds should watch for unusual deaths, a drop in egg production, a significant decrease in water intake, or an increase in the number of sick birds. If bird flu is suspected in domestic birdscontact MDARD immediately at 800-292-3939 (daytime) or 517-373-0440 (after hours).

For wild birds

If anyone notices what appear to be unusual or unexplained deaths among wild bird populations, please report such cases to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) by:

  • Using the DNR’s eyes in the Field app. Choose the “Sick Wildlife” option from the selections for “Observation Forms”.
  • Call the MNR Wildlife Disease Laboratory at 517-336-5030.

keep up to date

Subscribe to receive email notifications by visiting the MDARD website and clicking the “Bird flulink. After entering a valid email address, subscribers will receive updates and alerts regarding the state of avian flu in Michigan whenever there are new developments to report. Additional resources may also be found at Michigan.gov/BirdFlu.

More information on bird flu and how to protect flocks with biosecurity measures can be found on the US Department of Agriculture website.

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Michigan county conventions provide insight into controversial GOP primary races https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-conventions-provide-insight-into-controversial-gop-primary-races/ Thu, 14 Apr 2022 09:27:08 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-conventions-provide-insight-into-controversial-gop-primary-races/ Tensions between Trump supporters and other Republicans were particularly noticeable at the convention in Macomb County, Michigan. The Republican Party of Michigan has begun its process to choose delegates to its state convention this week along with a series of county party conventions, and judging by the events of some of those, a big question […]]]>

Tensions between Trump supporters and other Republicans were particularly noticeable at the convention in Macomb County, Michigan.

The Republican Party of Michigan has begun its process to choose delegates to its state convention this week along with a series of county party conventions, and judging by the events of some of those, a big question for the Michigan GOP is whether energy and attendance at meetings will bring him success at the polls – or disarray.

Delegates selected from the 83 county conventions will attend the party’s state convention in Lansing on April 23 and endorse candidates for state attorney general, secretary of state and other positions. There are about 6,000 delegates eligible to attend the conventions, and Monday night’s turnout involved a large percentage of them.

The divide within the GOP — nationally and locally — is largely between the “MAGA” camp of supporters of former President Donald Trump and the more traditional establishment Republicans, a split that became clear after the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the United States Capitol and Trump’s ongoing election fraud allegations. As the BBC said recently: “Politicians and potential candidates are making calculations on how to succeed in an environment where Mr. Trump is out of office but not in power.”

The tensions between the two types of Republicans were particularly noticeable during the Macomb County convention on April 11. Macomb is Michigan’s third-most populous county and a known Trump stronghold, opting for Trump by 48,000 votes in 2016 and 40,000 in 2020. Five of the 14 Michiganders charged who took part in the January 6 assault were from Macomb.

The convention was “noisy”, according to some attendees, with people heckling and shouting insults at each other. As reported by Michigan Advance, at 20 minutes, the meeting was “in chaos”, with police to attempt to defuse conflict between participants.

Macomb County GOP Chairman Mark Forton, who had defied opponents to have him arrested, was ousted from his position at the convention by a vote of no confidence and was replaced by local councilman Eric Castiglia. A fervent believer that the 2020 election was stolen, Forton has frequently criticized other Republicans, including Michigan GOP Chairman Ron Weiser and state Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey, for having does too little to demand new audits of the presidential election.

Castiglia brought a plus reconciliation note to the proceedings, saying the county party should be a “safe haven for all Republicans” and lamenting the overuse of the term “RINO” or “Republican in name only” to describe those not loyal enough to Trump.

Key to Monday’s conventions was the race for Michigan attorney general, split between Matt DePerno, a Trump-backed attorney from Kalamazoo; Tom Leonard, former Speaker of the State House; and Ryan Berman, a current member of State House. DePerno, in true Trump style, had urged his supporters to “storm the convention” during a rally with Trump on April 2 and set up an information forum website using the sentence as a title.

Detroit News’ Craig Mauger tweeted on April 12, Leonard had said, “Matt DePerno’s misguided call to storm the convention only led to a light drizzle.”

John Yob, consultant for DePerno, claims from ‘Storm the convention’: “The goal was to get attention to inspire MAGA to fill vacancies in the big counties, mostly alternates who will be high on the ground. The turnout was fantastic. It worked perfectly. Matt DePerno will win big at the state convention.” Other supporters thought it was likely that DePerno would win many delegates from high-population areas like Macomb, Wayne, and Oakland counties.

For their part, the Leonard and Berman campaigns also claims having spent successful nights. Berman noted Trump’s “kingmaker” role in the race, but said he believed he could beat DePerno in the primaries. Leonard is well positioned and known personally by many delegates, and his campaign believed it won more delegates than expected. Neither candidate is being prosecuted by allegations of financial and legal irregularities as is DePerno.

Matt Marko, the chairman of the Republican Party of Oakland, told the American Independent Foundation that the Republican Party in Michigan has been divided and “for years.” Yesterday’s anti-establishment, he says, is today’s establishment. He believes delegates “know that President Trump is receiving information and scripts from this biased establishment. For example, his negative comments about AG nominee Tom Leonard.”

“Most delegates,” he said, “will do their homework and determine the best candidates who can win the general election.”

Two candidates in the race for Michigan’s 3rd congressional district made an appearance at the Kent County convention. Representative Peter Meijer, the incumbent, was mocked by some participants. Meijer was one of only 10 House Republicans to vote to impeach Trump in January 2021 for instigating a storming of the US Capitol, in a move he has recognized “could have been an act of political suicide.”

“He’s a Democrat pretending to be a Republican,” Marko said.

Trump endorsed Meijer’s GOP opponent, John Gibbs, who served in the US Department of Housing and Urban Development during his administration. Gibbs took a broad approach pro-Trump platform, including an “America First” creed on its website which states, among other things, “The American people are precious, unique in the world, and have a basic right to exist.”

He also cites as a significant problem for Gibbs the “widespread irregularities and statistical anomalies in the 2020 election” and notes: “Diabolical schemes such as critical race theory and similar ideologies, which seek to demonize and blame all white Americans for all the ills of our past, are unjust, hateful, divisive and often illegal.”

In a statement to the American Independent Foundation, Gibbs called the night a success for his campaign: “An independent poll shows I’m ahead of Meijer by 19 points, but after seeing how Meijer was booed at the Kent County convention – the biggest reaction of the night – I can win by an even bigger margin.”

Meijer’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

In a series of tweets in 2016, Gibbs repeatedly promoted a conspiracy theory that Hillary Clinton campaign manager John Podesta participated in a satanic ritual; criticized Islam; and called establishment Republicans “cucks,” a pejorative term favored by the alt-right.

Commenting on Trump’s overall influence in these races, Matt Marko concedes that such influence could prove decisive. He added: “You may also find what may seem like disproportionate influence to be an illusion.”

Published with permission of the American Independent Foundation.

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