department health – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 16:01:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png department health – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 End of an era: Michigan’s final county rescinds school mask mandate as omicron swell abates https://blissfield.net/end-of-an-era-michigans-final-county-rescinds-school-mask-mandate-as-omicron-swell-abates/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 16:14:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/end-of-an-era-michigans-final-county-rescinds-school-mask-mandate-as-omicron-swell-abates/ The last countywide school masking mandate has been rescinded. As of 8 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 17, Wayne County, the state’s most populous, rescinded its August emergency health order. “This decision comes after the (Michigan Department of Health and Human Services) expired its public health advisory on masking in indoor public places,” a brief statement read. […]]]>

The last countywide school masking mandate has been rescinded.

As of 8 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 17, Wayne County, the state’s most populous, rescinded its August emergency health order.

“This decision comes after the (Michigan Department of Health and Human Services) expired its public health advisory on masking in indoor public places,” a brief statement read.

On Wednesday, Feb. 16, the state health department relaxed its mask-wearing recommendations, no longer requiring students and school staff to wear a universal mask. This came as Michigan’s seven-day average of newly reported cases, percentage of positive tests and hospitalizations for COVID-19 continued to decline from record highs last month.

Last week, Oakland, Ingham and Washtenaw counties and the Benzie-Leelanau District Health Department in northern Michigan and the Northwestern Michigan Health Department, which covers the counties of Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego, have announced that they will lift the requirements. Orders from Oakland and Washtenaw counties will not expire until February 28.

In September, in the absence of a statewide order, there were 16 counties with health department mask orders. School districts outside of these counties were given autonomy to set their own requirements. Many of these individual districts also recently dropped mask requirements, although some remain in place.

In a letter, Wayne County Chief Medical Officer Avani Sheth said masking is still important to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Children should “continue to be encouraged to wear a mask” taking into account their vaccination status, because they or members of their household are at risk, or for other reasons. Masking is still recommended as part of isolation and quarantine periods, she wrote.

RELATED: More Washtenaw County schools are making masks optional

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends those infected self-isolate for five days and wear a mask for an additional five days. Vaccinated people who have been exposed must wear a mask for 10 days. Those who are not vaccinated or who have not received a timely booster must stay at home for five days and then mask up for five days.

Masking at school has been the subject of much debate, often contentious. There have been protests and school board meetings filled with angry parents. Now school districts are facing lawsuits.

Dr. Christine Nefcy, chief medical officer of Traverse City-based Munson Healthcare, noted this week that there were still high rates of COVID-19 positivity in Northern Michigan and elsewhere in the state. In some counties, particularly western and northwestern Michigan, the seven-day average positive test rate was 15-20%. The state’s seven-day average on Wednesday was around 9%. Although much lower than it was in January, when it exceeded 30%, it is still nearly double the 5% danger threshold established at the start of the pandemic.

People who know they are at high risk of serious illness should remain cautious, Nefcy said. “For anyone feeling uncomfortable with the easing of restrictions, it’s certainly not a bad thing to continue masking or avoid public and crowded places.”

She encourages frequent handwashing and vaccination of children, who are much less likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 than older age groups.

“I think we all have to try to find the right balance,” she said.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend people wear masks in indoor public spaces if they live in areas with high or substantial community transmission, which means there have been 50 new cases or more per 100,000 people last week. Every county in Michigan is currently eligible, according to CDC and state data.

Rick Sadler, associate professor in the Division of Public Health/Department of Family Medicine at Michigan State University, said he sees health departments adjusting guidelines as transmission levels increase. or decreased. It’s always helpful to wear a mask when few of them are infected, but there is a level of inconvenience people see, he said.

“I think (masking) is a simple, friendly thing to do when we know there are outbreaks,” he said.

Learn more about MLive:

Michigan withdraws advisory on masks, including for schools, as ‘worst omicron surge is behind us’

Michigan COVID data for Thursday, February 17: Cases 8 times lower than 4 weeks ago

Michigan doctor urges COVID vaccine as new data shows it also protects babies

“I Thought I Was Watching Him Die,” Mom Says of Son With MIS-C

“You cry with them,” Bronson’s nurse says at Kalamazoo COVID-19 vigil

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Most Michigan County Health Departments Waive School Mask Requirements https://blissfield.net/most-michigan-county-health-departments-waive-school-mask-requirements/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/most-michigan-county-health-departments-waive-school-mask-requirements/ As the omicron wave of COVID-19 appears to be abating, statewide health officials are rescinding countywide school mask mandates. On Friday, Oakland County, the Benzie-Leelanau District Health Department in northern Michigan and the Northwest Michigan Health Department, which covers Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties , announced that they would lift requirements that masks be […]]]>

As the omicron wave of COVID-19 appears to be abating, statewide health officials are rescinding countywide school mask mandates.

On Friday, Oakland County, the Benzie-Leelanau District Health Department in northern Michigan and the Northwest Michigan Health Department, which covers Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet and Otsego counties , announced that they would lift requirements that masks be worn in school settings.

The Oakland County order expires Feb. 28. Northern Michigan orders end earlier, Thursday, February 17.

These counties are only the latest to make such decisions, as case numbers have fallen from steep slopes in the past month. Hospitalizations related to COVID-19 are down about 50% from record numbers in mid-January. Less than 11% of coronavirus tests were positive on Tuesday, February 8. This is the lowest rate since October.

The Washtenaw County Health Department also announced Friday that it will be eliminating its school COVID-19 masks, isolation and quarantine requirements, effective Feb. 28.

These came a day after the Ingham County Health Department rescinded its emergency orders mandating masks in educational institutions and quarantine and isolation procedures for close contact with the school, from February 19.

This leaves only Wayne County with an order that is not expired or does not expire. “At this time, our mask mandate remains in place,” a spokesperson wrote in response to a question about whether the county intended to maintain its requirement.

“As we see our critical metrics of vaccinations, hospital admissions and cases trending in a direction that tells us the impact of COVID-19 on our community is dramatically improving, now is the time to remove ordering masks for child care centers and educational institutions,” Oakland County Health Division Medical Director Dr. Russell Faust said in a statement.

Oakland County and other officials have issued the notice to give school district administrators time to prepare staff, board members and families.

“The Health Division still strongly recommends wearing a mask in indoor public places, including educational facilities,” the Oakland County statement read.

Health departments noted that federal and state authorities, including the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, continue to recommend indoor masking in public places. , especially when transmission levels are high.

While there hasn’t been a statewide requirement since June, Michigan now has an active public health advisory, first issued before Thanksgiving: All residents, regardless of their vaccination status, must wear masks in indoor public places. The state health department has also recommended universal school masking. “We still recommend masks, but are monitoring the data closely and will provide updated guidance as needed,” a spokesperson reported.

“We are at a point in this pandemic where public health strategies will begin to move more towards personal responsibility as we learn to live with COVID-19 over the long term,” said Linda Vail, chief health officer. Ingham County Health, in a statement. “As a public health agency, we will continue to support local school districts by recommending evidence-based public health measures, educating on current guidelines and practices, and making recommendations to stay safe and healthy. in good health.”

Mask mandates have been a point of community contention since late summer. The issue was hotly debated, often vitriolally and sometimes with threats, in crowded school board meetings across the state. Several school districts are facing related lawsuits.

RELATED: Mask mandate prompts Oakland County parents to sue 3 school districts and health department

In September, there were 16 counties with health department mask orders. School districts outside of these counties were allowed to set their own requirements. Leaders in many districts with their own mandates have already removed them. At the beginning of this month, the number of districts to cancel orders dropped by about 20%.

RELATED: Find out which public school districts in Michigan are currently mandating masks

The Northwestern Michigan Health Department cited falling case numbers per capita, hospitalization rates that haven’t risen as quickly as infection rates, and the availability of childhood vaccines.

“Parents have had ample opportunity to immunize their eligible school-aged children,” a health department press release said.

Since November, all children 5 and older are eligible for COVID-19 vaccines. However, vaccination rates among children are low. About 39.6% of children ages 5 to 19 have received at least one injection in Michigan. The rate is lowest, about 26%, among 5-11 year olds.

The state seems to have reached a turning point.

The number of new cases, although still high, continues to decline. The seven-day average of new reported cases has fallen to less than 4,000 a day this week. It was the lowest number of cases per day in seven days since early November. That’s down 59% from last week. On January 19, Michigan averaged 17,595 new cases per day.

Per capita rates, however, are still significant enough to put all of the state’s 83 counties in the highest risk category, according to state data this week.

New school outbreaks were also down. Last week, there were 99 new outbreaks of COVID-19 in K-12 schools affecting approximately 700 students and staff. This is down from 126 new outbreaks affecting around 1,000 students and staff the previous week.

“The mask mandate was always intended to be temporary. It was always intended to be used when we have epidemic conditions that require this safety measure to be in place, ”said Lisa Peacock, health officer for the Benzie-Leelanau District Health Department and the Department of Northwest Michigan Health, at a COVID conference in Northern Michigan. updated this week hosted by Traverse City-based Munson Healthcare.

This story has been updated to include a quote from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services on the status of its mask recommendations.

Learn more about MLive:

As COVID surged, Michigan schools scrapped mask mandates

Michigan COVID data for Thursday, Feb. 10: Cases plummet — and the evidence is in shit

They served overseas. Now a military medical team is helping out in Michigan

Michigan family have hours to figure out father’s death from COVID before daughter is hospitalized

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Hazel Park becomes the latest town in Michigan to ban conversion therapy https://blissfield.net/hazel-park-becomes-the-latest-town-in-michigan-to-ban-conversion-therapy/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 17:10:34 +0000 https://blissfield.net/hazel-park-becomes-the-latest-town-in-michigan-to-ban-conversion-therapy/ Conversion therapy for minors was officially banned by Hazel Park City Council after a unanimous vote on Tuesday. “This order banning conversion therapy embodies our continued commitment to the LGBTQ community, while protecting our children from dangerous and discredited practices that have no legitimate medical basis,” said Board Member Luke Londo, who presented the prescription […]]]>

Conversion therapy for minors was officially banned by Hazel Park City Council after a unanimous vote on Tuesday.

“This order banning conversion therapy embodies our continued commitment to the LGBTQ community, while protecting our children from dangerous and discredited practices that have no legitimate medical basis,” said Board Member Luke Londo, who presented the prescription and identifies as bisexual.

By passing the ban, Hazel Park becomes the sixth city in the state to have both a Human Rights Ordinance (HRO) and a conversion therapy ban. The city joins Ann Arbor, East Lansing, Ferndale, Huntington Woods and Royal Oak, all of which have HROs prohibiting discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodation on the basis of sexual orientation, identity of gender and gender expression, as well as bans on conversion therapy.

Conversion therapy has been widely condemned by the medical community and has been documented by numerous studies to pose a significant risk of serious emotional and physical harm to young people who experience it. Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed Executive Directive 2021-3 in June 2021, which requires the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to “take necessary action to prohibit the use of state and federal funds for the harmful practice of conversion therapy on minors.”

“From day one, I’ve made it clear that hate has no place in Michigan,” Whitmer said. at the time. “My administration is committed to removing the systemic barriers faced by young LGBTQ+ Michiganders so that our state is a place where they can reach their full potential.”

The Evolution of Hazel Park’s Commitment to Members of the LGBTQ+ Community

Hazel Park, along with nearby Ferndale and Royal Oak, well known as LGBTQ+ havens, has taken steps to truly open its arms to the LGBTQ+ community in recent years. The city adopted its HRO in April of Last year, sponsored by Londo and Councilmember Alissa Sullivan. The city hosted its first Pride in the Park celebration in 2019.

“Hazel Park has had an active and vibrant LGBTQ community for years,” Londo told Pride Source. “City Council has been very deliberate lately in seizing opportunities to recognize our LGBTQ residents, whether it’s raising the Pride flag each June, hosting a Pride event, or passing legislation to protect their civil rights.

“In fact, when I first mentioned wanting to pass a human rights ordinance last year, everyone was under the impression that we already had one,” Londo continued. “I was just codifying what was common practice – ensuring that our LGBTQ community was protected and celebrated.”

The ordinance still has to pass a second reading, which will take place at the Hazel Park town council meeting on March 8. Once adopted at second reading, it will enter into force later this month.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misspelled Luke Londo’s last name as Lonzo.

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Rural Michigan County Gets First Syringe Program https://blissfield.net/rural-michigan-county-gets-first-syringe-program/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 17:32:40 +0000 https://blissfield.net/rural-michigan-county-gets-first-syringe-program/ [ad_1] A rural Michigan county gets its first syringe service program (SSP). It comes at a time when the state is reporting an increase in HIV diagnoses attributable to injection drug use. PHC provides sterile needles to people who inject drugs such as heroin to prevent the spread of disease through sharing needles. On November […]]]>


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A rural Michigan county gets its first syringe service program (SSP). It comes at a time when the state is reporting an increase in HIV diagnoses attributable to injection drug use. PHC provides sterile needles to people who inject drugs such as heroin to prevent the spread of disease through sharing needles.

On November 24, the Mid-Michigan District Health Board vote to approve an SSP. The district represents the counties of Montcalm, Clinton and Gratiot. The SSP would open first in Montcalm County, then later expand to Clinton and Gratiot if county officials are satisfied it is functioning well. Under Michigan law, syringes are considered illegal drug paraphernalia. But the distribution of sterile syringes as a public health intervention is legal, if authorized by a government agency.

Currently, the closest Montcalm County SSP residents can reach Ionia, which is over 35 km from its largest city, Greenville. The county will join Red Project, a Grand Rapids nonprofit that already operates syringe services statewide.

“The best practice when it comes to syringe access is to provide syringes on an as-needed basis,” said Red Project executive director Steve Alsum. Filtered. “So working with each client, talking with them about how often they inject, when they can take the program, how many people in their social network inject… tWe take this opportunity when we see a participant to provide him with as many syringes as he needs so that he can use a sterile syringe for each injection.

The Michigan State Department of Health recently reported that Montcalm County is experiencing an unusual increase in HIV diagnoses, linked to injection drug use.

Programs in some cities and states follow “one-to-one” guidelines, which they may be mandated to do. This means that only one syringe is given to each participant for each used syringe returned. The practice contradicts the scientific consensus—including CDC—On the best way to reduce blood borne diseases. Fortunately, Red Project gives customers as many as they need.

Red Project offers rapid HIV and hepatitis C testing in addition to syringe services. It will not actually operate the SSP in Montcalm County, but instead provide training and other support to the Department of Health as the department launches the program.

Michigan State Department of Health recently reported that Montcalm County is seeing an unusual increase in HIV diagnoses linked to injection drug use. At the same time, HIV diagnoses are on the decline for the entire state of Michigan.

There are no current data on HIV diagnoses in Montcalm County, but HIV prevalence has historically been relatively low. In 2019 the county had 54.7 HIV cases per 100,000 population. By comparison, Detroit has 713.3 per 100,000 population.

According to the data Provided to county council, Montcalm County paramedics also administer significantly less naloxone than the state average, even though opioid-related deaths are 1.7 times the state average. So far this year, 21 people in the county are believed to have died from an overdose. This would equate to 33 people per 100,000, which is significantly higher than the national death rate of 21.6 people per 100,000. in 2019.

It is not yet clear what other services the Montcalm County SSP will provide. Mid-Michigan District Health Department public information officer refused Filteredrequest for comments, other than indicating that it is too early to share details.

Alsum also pointed out that details of the new SSP were not yet finalized. But because the county has agreed to partner with his organization to train them, he suspects the services will closely resemble those currently offered by Red Project. He estimated that if all goes well, the program should be open as early as January 2022.


Photograph of Project Red in Grand Rapids Harm Reduction Services, via Facebook.

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Michigan County Official Resigns Over Public Health ‘Politicization’ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/#respond Sun, 24 Oct 2021 13:41:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/ [ad_1] ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits job in southwest Michigan. Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Head of Communications Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported. Davis ordered masks from […]]]>


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ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits job in southwest Michigan.

Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Head of Communications Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported.

Davis ordered masks from local schools to reduce the spread of COVID-19, although the order was dropped on September 29 when the Department of Health felt its public funding would be threatened. She said at the time that it was “appalling” that the money was tied to mask policies.

Davis said it was an honor to work for the department for almost five years.

“However, with the politicization of public health during the pandemic, I can no longer do my job effectively and serve the community with their health and safety always at the forefront,” she said.

A d

Davis’ last day is November 3.

Upon stepping down, Conrad said the pandemic had had a “significant impact” on his mental and physical health.

County administrator Brian Dissette said there had been only one candidate for the post of permanent health worker, a role Davis held on an interim basis.

He said he informed the state’s health department of the vacancies to try to add more “power horses” to the research.

Read more: Michigan Politics Headlines

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Michigan County Health Officer Resigns Over “Politicization of Public Health” https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:51:54 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/ [ad_1] item FILE – Children wear protective masks inside an elementary school classroom with separate desks for social distancing measures. ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits his job in southwest Michigan. Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when […]]]>


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FILE – Children wear protective masks inside an elementary school classroom with separate desks for social distancing measures.

County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits his job in southwest Michigan.

Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Communications director Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported.

Davis ordered masks from local schools to reduce the spread of COVID-19, although the order was dropped on September 29 when the Department of Health felt its public funding would be threatened. She said at the time that it was “appalling” that the money was tied to mask policies.

Davis said it was an honor to work for the department for almost five years.

“However, with the politicization of public health during the pandemic, I can no longer do my job effectively and serve the community with their health and safety always at the forefront,” she said.

Davis’ last day is November 3.

Upon stepping down, Conrad said the pandemic had had a “significant impact” on his mental and physical health.

County administrator Brian Dissette said there had been only one candidate for the post of permanent health worker, a role Davis held on an interim basis.

He said he informed the state’s health department of the vacancies to try to add more “power” to the research.

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Michigan city declares state of emergency over lead-contaminated water https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-declares-state-of-emergency-over-lead-contaminated-water-2/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-declares-state-of-emergency-over-lead-contaminated-water-2/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:07:42 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-declares-state-of-emergency-over-lead-contaminated-water-2/ [ad_1] Officials in Benton Harbor, Mich., Announced a state of emergency earlier this week as part of an ongoing effort to replace the city’s lead pipes, CNN reports. Driving the news: The state of emergency, enacted Monday by the City Commission, was intended to trigger a comprehensive government approach to replace several lead pipes that […]]]>


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Officials in Benton Harbor, Mich., Announced a state of emergency earlier this week as part of an ongoing effort to replace the city’s lead pipes, CNN reports.

Driving the news: The state of emergency, enacted Monday by the City Commission, was intended to trigger a comprehensive government approach to replace several lead pipes that have contaminated the city’s water supply.

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic information with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free

  • A water main rupture occurred Tuesday in Benton Harbor, ultimately causing a loss of water pressure throughout the city, according to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

  • As of this week, more than 71,000 cases of free bottled water have been distributed to residents of Benton Harbor since the crisis began in September, according to the department.

  • Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D) has asked the state legislature to provide an additional investment of $ 11.4 million to help replace the city’s lead pipes.

What they say : “We understand that the residents of Benton Harbor are going through very stressful times, ”said Elizabeth Hertel, director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, in a statement.

  • “I want them to know that the state is fully committed to ensuring that families have access to safe drinking water,” she added.

  • “Every Michigander deserves clean drinking water,” Whitmer said in a press release Tuesday. “We will not rest until every parent feels able to give their child a glass of water knowing it is safe.”

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Southwest Michigan City Lead Levels Trigger Health Warnings, State Urges Residents To Use Only Bottled Water https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-city-lead-levels-trigger-health-warnings-state-urges-residents-to-use-only-bottled-water/ https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-city-lead-levels-trigger-health-warnings-state-urges-residents-to-use-only-bottled-water/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 10:32:20 +0000 https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-city-lead-levels-trigger-health-warnings-state-urges-residents-to-use-only-bottled-water/ [ad_1] item (Matthieu Horwood / Getty Images) DETROIT – Michigan on Wednesday urged residents of Benton Harbor to use only bottled water for cooking and drinking, a major change in response to the city’s high lead levels. The state recently announced that it will distribute free water and filters in the southwestern Michigan city. But […]]]>


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(Matthieu Horwood / Getty Images)

Michigan on Wednesday urged residents of Benton Harbor to use only bottled water for cooking and drinking, a major change in response to the city’s high lead levels.

The state recently announced that it will distribute free water and filters in the southwestern Michigan city. But federal regulators are now reviewing the effectiveness of filters in removing lead from water at certain levels, according to the Department of Health.

The state said more than 15,000 cases of water will be delivered in the coming days to the predominantly black, low-income community.

“We think they’re probably effective,” said Elizabeth Hertel, director of the health department, of the filters.

“At this time, don’t use water for cooking or drinking, even filtered water, until we can guarantee the effectiveness of these filters,” Hertel told The Associated Press.

She didn’t know how long it would take. So far, filters have been distributed to more than 2,600 homes, the department said.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has said it is evaluating the performance of the filters specifically on Benton Harbor water chemistry.

“Certified filters that are properly installed and maintained are very effective in reducing lead levels in drinking water,” the EPA said, citing studies.

A local activist, Rev. Edward Pinkney, said he had boxes of filters in his church. He is happy with the state’s emphasis on bottled water, but said residents need to hear a louder message.

“Water is dangerous to use. Period. Any use. This will get more attention here,” Pinkney said.

Benton Harbor, with a population of 9,600, is located in Berrien County, 160 km from Chicago. Pinkney and environmental groups have accused Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s administration and local officials of failing to respond adequately since the discovery of lead contamination three years ago.

Whitmer has called for spending $ 20 million at Benton Harbor to replace nearly 6,000 service lines, most of which are suspected of containing lead, within five years.

Lead is considered harmful at all levels, and children are particularly vulnerable because it can slow growth and lead to learning and behavior problems.

300 kilometers away in Flint, lead contamination occurred in 2014-15 because water drawn from a river was not properly treated to reduce corrosion in old pipes. The river was used as a cost saving measure by managers appointed by the government of the day. Rick Snyder.

Benton Harbor, like many communities in western Michigan, draws its water from Lake Michigan. The problem apparently is the condition of the water after it has been treated and is routed through an aging distribution system to homes.

While advising residents to use bottled water, the state has always urged them to run their faucets or tubs daily to keep tap water flowing.

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Every county in Michigan is now considered to be at high risk for transmission of the coronavirus https://blissfield.net/every-county-in-michigan-is-now-considered-to-be-at-high-risk-for-transmission-of-the-coronavirus/ https://blissfield.net/every-county-in-michigan-is-now-considered-to-be-at-high-risk-for-transmission-of-the-coronavirus/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 15:09:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/every-county-in-michigan-is-now-considered-to-be-at-high-risk-for-transmission-of-the-coronavirus/ [ad_1] Michigan’s 83 counties have been found to be at high risk for coronavirus transmission, according to the latest data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC has used a four-tier system to assess the risk of community transmission since late July, when rates of positive cases and tests started […]]]>


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Michigan’s 83 counties have been found to be at high risk for coronavirus transmission, according to the latest data from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC has used a four-tier system to assess the risk of community transmission since late July, when rates of positive cases and tests started to climb again across the country. Counties with “high” or “substantial” levels are recommended to hide indoors regardless of their immunization status, while counties with “moderate” or “low” transmission do not necessarily need the same. preventive measures.

As of Tuesday, Sept. 28, the entire state of Michigan fell into the top category, meaning their weekly case rates exceeded 100 per 100,000 population and / or their positive test rates were 10% or more.

Over the past few weeks, the vast majority of the state had been rated as “high” risk, but a few counties would drop to a lower risk level for a few days / weeks at a time. A month ago, there were 20 counties at the “substantial” risk level and one at the “moderate” risk level.

Over the past week, Michigan has reported an average of 2,842 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 28 deaths per day, according to data from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. That’s against 2,110 cases and 20 deaths a day two weeks ago.

The rates of positive COVID tests climbed to 10% in early September, but have since declined slightly to around 9% on average. That’s still higher than the national average, and health officials would prefer that daily average to be less than 5%.

Below is a map showing the transmission level for each county in Michigan based on CDC standards. Red and orange counties indicate high and substantial transmission, while yellow indicates moderate transmission and blue indicates low transmission.

(Can’t see the map? Click here)

Across the country, 48 states are high transmission, including Michigan. The exceptions are Connecticut, which has moved to a substantial risk level, and California, which has taken a step closer to the moderate risk level.

About 94.6% of counties nationwide are at high risk (3,046), leaving just 85 at high risk, 62 at moderate risk and 26 at low risk as of Tuesday.

Health officials recommend that all individuals wear a mask indoors in communities with “high” or “substantial” transmission of the coronavirus. Physical distancing, hand washing, and immunization are additional measures to help reduce the risk of contracting the coronavirus and developing COVID-19.

The latest case data used by the CDC is September 20-26, and the latest test data is September 18-24. For more up-to-date transmission data, visit CDC’s online COVID data tracker.

To find a vaccine near you, visit Michigan’s COVID-19 vaccine website where to go to VaccineFinder.org.

Learn more about MLive:

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Shiawassee may be the only county in Michigan to give COVID-19 relief funds to elected officials https://blissfield.net/shiawassee-may-be-the-only-county-in-michigan-to-give-covid-19-relief-funds-to-elected-officials/ https://blissfield.net/shiawassee-may-be-the-only-county-in-michigan-to-give-covid-19-relief-funds-to-elected-officials/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/shiawassee-may-be-the-only-county-in-michigan-to-give-covid-19-relief-funds-to-elected-officials/ [ad_1] UPDATE: Shiawassee County Elected Officials Agree to Refund COVID-19 Risk Payments UPDATE: Shiawassee County Confirms 6 Employees Received $ 25,000 Each in COVID-19 Relief Fund SHIAWASSEE COUNTY, MI – There are 83 counties in Michigan, but Shiawassee County may be the only one in the state giving COVID-19 relief funds to elected officials. Shiawassee […]]]>


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UPDATE: Shiawassee County Elected Officials Agree to Refund COVID-19 Risk Payments

UPDATE: Shiawassee County Confirms 6 Employees Received $ 25,000 Each in COVID-19 Relief Fund

SHIAWASSEE COUNTY, MI – There are 83 counties in Michigan, but Shiawassee County may be the only one in the state giving COVID-19 relief funds to elected officials.

Shiawassee County Commissioners’ Council members last week paid high-level administrators and commissioners up to $ 25,000 each as a risk bonus, more than 10 times more than they paid workers in frontline workers who have been directly exposed to the coronavirus while doing their job in person.

Stephan Currie, executive director of the Michigan Association of Counties, told MLive-The Flint Journal in a statement Wednesday, July 21, that his group has been working closely with counties on how best to use federal funds in the plan. rescue fund (ARP), but has not heard from other people planning to pay a risk premium to elected officials.

“We are not aware of any other county considering payments to elected officials, and the MAC has not provided any guidance or advice on doing so,” the statement from Currie said.

“With the help of many partners, MAC has provided a wealth of resources on how to use US bailout funds and properly comply with federal guidelines and the spirit of the law to all of our member counties. . Decisions, however, ultimately rest with the county council of commissioners in each county, ”the statement said. “MAC continues to work with all of our members on any questions or concerns they have with ARP funds.”

Records obtained by MLive-The Flint Journal show that Shiawassee County’s “top administrators”, including board chairman Jeremy R. Root, received $ 25,000 each from ARP funds while chiefs department each received $ 12,500. Those responsible for “middle management” received $ 5,000 each, while chief assistants, Department of Health employees and county prosecutors received $ 2,500.

The breakdown written by County Coordinator Brian Boggs shows that employees identified as “cleaning staff” received $ 2,000 each and all other employees received $ 1,000.

MLive-The Flint Journal was unable to reach Root or Boggs to comment on the cash distributions.

A spokesperson for the US Department of the Treasury said the wording of the interim final rules released by the agency make it clear that ARP dollars used for the risk premium should prioritize low-income workers who have been hit so hard. disproportionate by the pandemic and to essential workers who faced the greatest risk of exposure.

A list of frequently asked questions of the Treasury Department’s website defines essential workers as employees “in areas of critical infrastructure who regularly perform work in person, interact with others at work, or physically handle objects manipulated by others.”

Only essential workers who regularly perform face-to-face work, interact with others at work, or physically handle objects handled by others are eligible for the federal funds risk premium, the spokesperson said.

States and localities will be required to account for their use of these funds and show that they have been spent in accordance with Treasury guidelines.

Shiawassee County Commissioner Cindy L. Garber, who received a payment of $ 5,000, said Tuesday, July 20, that she believed officials followed federal guidelines on spending COVID-19 relief funds.

“I worked in person… I was there every day,” said Garber, who said she had no intention of returning the money that was given to her.

In addition to Garber and Root, Shiawassee County Commissioners John B. Plowman and Brandon Marks received $ 10,000, and the other three Commissioners each received $ 5,000.

Commissioner Marlene Webster said she was returning the risk premium deposited to her bank account, and said the decision to provide the extra money to county employees last week was never detailed to show payments to commissioners.

Garber said lower-level employees were already receiving additional compensation during the pandemic because they were receiving additional unemployment benefits while being made redundant one day a week.

“I’m going to take (President Joe Biden’s) advice and spend the money… it’s meant to stimulate the economy,” Garber said.

Learn more about MLive:

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