st joseph – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Fri, 25 Mar 2022 16:01:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png st joseph – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 Annette Carlson Obituary (2022) – Michigan City, IN https://blissfield.net/annette-carlson-obituary-2022-michigan-city-in/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 23:38:21 +0000 https://blissfield.net/annette-carlson-obituary-2022-michigan-city-in/ Annette N. Carlson, 83, of Michigan City, Indiana, died at home on January 23, 2022, with her loving family by her side. Christian Funeral Mass will be held on February 2, 2022 at 10 a.m. at Queen of All Saints Church. Entombment will take place after Mass in Swan Lake Memorial Gardens. The viewing will […]]]>

Annette N. Carlson, 83, of Michigan City, Indiana, died at home on January 23, 2022, with her loving family by her side.

Christian Funeral Mass will be held on February 2, 2022 at 10 a.m. at Queen of All Saints Church. Entombment will take place after Mass in Swan Lake Memorial Gardens. The viewing will be February 1, 2022 from 4-6 p.m. at Root Funeral Home and February 2 from 9-10 a.m. at the Legacy Center at Queen of All Saints Church (before mass).

A rosary will be recited Tuesday at 5 p.m. at the funeral home.

Annette was born in Chicago, Illinois, and was predeceased by her parents, Charles and Zoa (Mitchell) Nichols, formerly of La Porte, Indiana; and one sister, LeEdda Johnson of McGregor, Minnesota.

On June 22, 1957, at La Porte at St. Joseph’s Church, she married the love of her life, Gus W. Carlson Jr., who predeceased her on July 15, 2016, but we are sure that he was there to greet his wife at the gates of heaven.

Surviving are five daughters, Joan (Jim) Ganschow of Trail Creek, Sue Ann Carlson of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Debi Nabhan of Valparaiso, Lori (Jerry) Wilson of Bridgman, Michigan, and Monique Cook of Michigan City; 14 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren; a sister-in-law; younger sister, Laura Lee Wroza of Sterling Heights Michigan; brother, Albert Bud Burbeck of California; two brothers-in-law, Jack Johnson of McGregor, Minnesota, and Patrick Carlson of Plymouth, Indiana; and many loving nieces, nephews and friends.

Annette was a woman of faith, an inspiring person full of grace, kindness and humor. She was a longtime member of Queen of All Saints Church, active in the church, including QAS festivals, and a volunteer at the Worship Chapel; an entrepreneur – with many exciting businesses, from buses and candles to concession stands; Leader of Girl Scout and State Council, Director of Girl Scout Camps in Motts Woods and Sony Springs, affectionately known as Woody; a member of Moose Family Center 980 and Elks Lodge 2532, where she was the former president of the Vivians; Meals on Wheels delivery; Ladies enjoyed Card Club every month for over 50 years with the same girls; and an avid reader, traveler, and sports enthusiast, especially Cubs, Bears, and Notre Dame sports.

Annette was a humble community activist who positively impacted many lives. She was a loving and devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother (GG), sister, aunt and friend.

She shared and lived the family mantra: Faith, Family & Fun!

Memoirs can be made at the Social and Learning Institute, Queen of All Saints Church or Marquette High School.

Published by La Porte County Herald-Dispatch on January 28, 2022.

]]>
Michigan city on edge as lead-water crisis persists https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 16:09:09 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/ [ad_1] BENTON HARBOR— Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water. Free water distribution sites are part of life in the predominantly black city, where nearly […]]]>


[ad_1]

BENTON HARBOR— Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water.

Free water distribution sites are part of life in the predominantly black city, where nearly half of the estimated 10,000 residents live below the poverty line. For three years, tests of its public water system revealed high levels of lead.

It takes time to wait for bottled water, and some residents are wondering why, in a state that recently faced the Flint water crisis, the problem was not resolved sooner.

“It’s tiring,” said Rhonda Nelson, queuing at a site run by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Benton Harbor.

“I understand what Flint was going through, I really understand it,” she said.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has pledged to spend millions of dollars to replace the city’s main service lines within 18 months – a breakneck pace for a process that often takes decades. For now, residents have been warned not to cook, drink or prepare formula with tap water.

Residents are concerned about what the high levels of lead mean for the health of their families. The problem is embarrassing and stressful. Drivers line up early at water distribution sites, keeping people away from work and families, and water should be used with care so that it does not run out. Queuing has consequences – idling uses up gasoline drivers who have to pay to refuel.

Exposure to lead can slow cognitive development, especially in young children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and federal officials say no amount of lead in drinking water is considered safe for their consumption. In recent months, activists have pushed for more aggressive action and the state has stepped up its response.

Some wonder if the problem would have been resolved more quickly if the residents of Benton Harbor were more like those of neighboring, predominantly white St. Joseph.

“Sometimes you just have to speak out against racism, and that’s what it feels like,” said Ambie Bell, handing out water to residents.

There are millions of aging underground lead lines connecting buildings to water pipes across the country, primarily in the Midwest, but also in other states like New Jersey and Massachusetts. Old pipes can become an urgent risk to public health. Newark, New Jersey, experienced prolonged lead water problems which led to the rapid replacement of thousands of lead pipes. The high test results in Clarksburg, West Virginia, sounded the alarm earlier this year. The word Flint is now synonymous with lead water problems.

Replacing major service lines is costly, straining tight local budgets. Infrastructure and reconciliation bills pending in Congress include billions to deal with leadline replacement which activists say could make a significant difference.

Flint’s lead water problem began when he switched his water source to the Flint River without proper treatment, corroding the lead pipes. But Benton Harbor’s water source, Lake Michigan, is considered safe, and many other places find water there.

“Our problem is clearly our own infrastructure,” said City Manager Ellis Mitchell.

On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency identified a series of violations at the Benton Harbor water facility – issues so serious that the city must consider relinquishing ownership, the EPA said.

“The people of Benton Harbor have suffered for too long,” EPA administrator Michael Regan said in a statement.

Water systems sometimes produce high test results, but in Benton Harbor authorities have been unable to bring them down. The long-term solution is to replace some 2,400 pipes that may contain lead, state officials said.

After the Flint water crisis, Michigan tightened requirements for lead in drinking water in 2018, boasting that it passed the most protective law in the country and demanded replacement of old water pipes. lead service.

Local environmental groups and activists filed a petition on Benton Harbor in September with the EPA, calling for aggressive action.

Michigan officials say they have taken the issue seriously.

In 2019, local authorities offered Benton Harbor residents filters designed to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water. Eric Oswald, director of the state’s drinking water division, said at a hearing on the matter last month that officials were studying the filters to make sure they were working properly. They also worked on corrosion control to reduce lead entering water from pipes. While the overall lead sampling results are still too high, the proportion of high readings has declined, officials said.

EPA inspectors, however, hit the city for failing to notify water customers in their water bills of the problem.

Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician and professor at Michigan State University who sounded the alarm bells about Flint, receives questions from parents about whether a developmental issue could be linked to lead in the water. However, it is extremely difficult to establish a link between an individual’s health problem and lead in water.

“This is why lead poisoning has eluded diagnosis, treatment and prevention for so long,” she said, adding that lead exposure is not safe for children and that ‘It’s too early to predict what the long-term impact might be. It can also depend on factors like poverty, which makes it particularly important to tackle the problem in cities like Benton Harbor, she said.

Sylvester Bownes, who wears a prosthesis on his right leg, said he had been drinking bottled water for years because he didn’t trust the water in Benton Harbor.

Pushing a cart full of cases of bottled water half a mile from his home, he said a ruptured water pipe temporarily cut off the public water supply, so without running water he had not only need bottled water for drinking, but essential needs like filling the toilet.

“Water is everything,” Bownes said. “It’s like gold.”

The Associated Press receives support from the Walton Family Foundation for coverage of water and environmental policy. The AP is solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s environmental coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/environment

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists/feed/ 0
Michigan city on edge as lead-water crisis persists https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 17:42:13 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/ [ad_1] BENTON HARBOR, Michigan – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water. Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black […]]]>


[ad_1]

BENTON HARBOR, Michigan – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear of the high levels of lead in city tap water.

Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black city of southwest Michigan, where nearly half of the estimated 10,000 residents live below the poverty line. For three years, tests of its public water system revealed high levels of lead.

It takes time to wait for free bottled water, and some residents are wondering why, in a state that recently faced the Flint water crisis, the problem was not resolved sooner.

“It’s tiring,” said Rhonda Nelson, queuing at a site run by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Benton Harbor.

“I understand what Flint was going through, I really understand it,” she said.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has pledged to spend millions of dollars to replace the city’s main service lines within 18 months – a breakneck pace for a process that often takes decades. For now, residents have been warned not to cook, drink or prepare formula with tap water.

Residents are concerned about what the high levels of lead mean for the health of their families. The problem is embarrassing and stressful as well. Drivers line up early at water distribution sites, driving people away from work and families. Bottled water should be used with care so that it does not run out. Even queues have consequences – idling consumes gasoline that drivers have to pay to refuel more often.

Standing in line, LaKeena Crawford worried about the consequences for her 8-year-old daughter, who she saw trying to turn on the water.

“I’m like ‘No!’ Crawford said, adding that she wanted her daughter to understand that lead in water is dangerous. But, “I don’t want to scare him too much.”

Exposure to lead can slow cognitive development, especially in young children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and federal officials say no amount of lead in drinking water is considered safe for their consumption. In recent months, activists have pressed for more immediate and aggressive action, and the state has stepped up its response.

Some wonder if the problem would have been resolved more quickly if the residents of Benton Harbor were more like those of neighboring, predominantly white St. Joseph.

“Sometimes it’s enough to speak out against racism, and that’s what it feels like,” said Ambie Bell, helping distribute water to residents.

There are millions of aging underground lead lines connecting buildings to water pipes across the country, mostly in the Midwest, but also scattered across other states like New Jersey and Massachusetts. Old pipes can become an urgent risk to public health. Newark, New Jersey, experienced prolonged lead water problems which led to the rapid replacement of thousands of lead pipes. The high test results in Clarksburg, West Virginia, sounded the alarm earlier this year. The word Flint is now synonymous with lead water problems.

Digging up and replacing lead service lines is costly, straining tight local budgets. Infrastructure and reconciliation bills pending in Congress include billions to deal with leadline replacement which activists say could make a significant difference.

The lead water problem in Flint began when this town switched its water source to the Flint River as a temporary saving measure without proper treatment, corroding its lead pipes. But Benton Harbor’s water source, Lake Michigan, is considered safe and many other places find their water there, said City Manager Ellis Mitchell.

“Our problem is clearly our own infrastructure,” he said.

On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency identified a series of violations at the Benton Harbor water facility. Federal inspection has found problems so serious that the city must consider relinquishing ownership, the EPA said.

“The people of Benton Harbor have suffered for too long,” EPA administrator Michael Regan said in a statement.

Water systems sometimes produce high test results, but in Benton Harbor authorities have been unable to bring them down. The long-term solution is to replace the roughly 2,400 pipes that may contain lead, state officials said.

The city also lacks resources. Previous governors installed emergency managers with broad decision-making power that downsized, and the city’s population shrank, reducing its tax base.

“This results in a ripple effect of reduced technical, managerial and financial capacity at the water plant due to underinvestment in personnel, equipment and training,” said Scott Dean, Door -speaking of the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

After the Flint water crisis, Michigan tightened requirements for lead in drinking water in 2018, boasting that it passed the most protective law in the country. He imposed more stringent requirements for testing water for lead and demanded that old lead service lines be replaced.

Environmental groups and local activists filed a petition on Benton Harbor in September with the EPA, calling for aggressive action. Reverend Edward Pinkney, an activist named on the petition, said if they had not filed a request, an aggressive official response might have taken even longer.

“We couldn’t take it anymore,” said Pinkney.

The Michigan House of Representatives oversight committee held a hearing last month on Benton Harbor. Republican Committee Chairman Steven Johnson asked why the state’s recent response to the city’s main crisis makes it appear to have gone “from zero to 100 miles an hour” even though the problem has persisted for years.

Michigan officials said they took the issue seriously, and on Thursday Governor Whitmer issued a directive calling for a review of current drinking water rules, including looking at ways to reduce lead levels and ensure that communities fully inform the public in the event of a problem.

Previous efforts have included providing Benton Harbor residents with filters to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water, although their effectiveness is under review, and corrosion control to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water. the pipes. While the overall lead sampling results are still too high, the proportion of high readings has declined, officials said.

Inspectors, however, have hit the city for failing to notify water customers in their water bills of the problem during a recent one-year period.

Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician and professor at Michigan State University who sounded the alarm bells about Flint. She receives questions from parents to find out if a developmental problem could be related to lead in the water. However, it is extremely difficult to establish a direct link between an individual’s health problem and lead in water.

“This is why lead poisoning has eluded diagnosis, treatment and prevention for so long,” she said, adding that lead exposure is not safe for children and that ‘It’s too early to predict what the long-term impact might be. Lead levels can vary among households, and individuals may respond to exposure differently. The impact may also depend on other factors like poverty, which makes it particularly important to tackle the problem in cities like Benton Harbor, she said.

Marc A. Edwards, a professor at Virginia Tech who specializes in water treatment, said the focus on Benton Harbor highlights a national problem with cities struggling with high lead levels. He said major water crises like Flint erode public confidence in the official management of water systems.

Sylvester Bownes, who wears a prosthetic right leg, said he had been drinking bottled water for years because he didn’t trust the water in Benton Harbor.

Pushing a makeshift cart full of several cases of bottled water half a mile from his home, he said a broken water pipe temporarily cut off the public water supply, so no running water, he not only needed bottled water for drinking, but water for basic needs like filling his toilet.

“Water is everything,” Bownes said. “It’s like gold.”

Homebound residents can call a hotline for water, but Bownes said the process is taking too long and unreliable. State officials said hundreds of people have been added to a list of weekly deliveries. If there are any issues, residents should report them, they said.

Mitchell, the city manager, said last month that customers are charged for water which authorities say can still be used for tasks such as laundry and washing up. He said the city was looking to see if there was any kind of relief about it for residents.

At the Boys & Girls Club, volunteers distributed nearly 2,200 cases at noon.

Nelson, who has daughters of 12 and 14 and a 5-year-old son, said preparing dinner may require 15 to 20 bottles of water. “I hope they fix it soon,” she said.

Greg Johnson, who was the first to stop around 8:15 a.m., said he arrived early so his family’s supplies could be replenished for his daughters, aged 8 and 11.

“It takes two cases in the morning to get them ready for school,” he said. “They have to wash up and stuff. It’s a bit hectic. “

———

The Associated Press receives support from the Walton Family Foundation for coverage of water and environmental policy. The AP is solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s environmental coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/environment

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/michigan-city-on-edge-as-lead-water-crisis-persists-2/feed/ 0
Another Michigan city struggles as lead levels remain high in tap water https://blissfield.net/another-michigan-city-struggles-as-lead-levels-remain-high-in-tap-water/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/another-michigan-city-struggles-as-lead-levels-remain-high-in-tap-water/ [ad_1] BENTON HARBOR, Mich. (AP) – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear the high levels of lead in city tap water. Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black […]]]>


[ad_1]

BENTON HARBOR, Mich. (AP) – Shortly after sunrise on a recent Saturday in Benton Harbor, Michigan, residents began lining up for free bottled water so they could drink and cook without fear the high levels of lead in city tap water.

Free water supplies are an integral part of life in the predominantly black city of southwest Michigan, where nearly half of the estimated 10,000 residents live below the poverty line. For three years, tests of its public water system revealed high levels of lead.

It takes time to wait for free bottled water, and some residents are wondering why, in a state that recently faced the Flint water crisis, the problem was not resolved sooner.

“It’s tiring,” said Rhonda Nelson, queuing at a site run by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Benton Harbor.

“I understand what Flint was going through, I really understand it,” she said.

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has pledged to spend millions of dollars to replace the city’s main service lines within 18 months – a breakneck pace for a process that often takes decades. For now, residents have been warned not to cook, drink or prepare formula with tap water.

Residents are concerned about what the high levels of lead mean for the health of their families. The problem is also embarrassing and stressful. Drivers line up early at water distribution sites, driving people away from work and families. Bottled water should be used with care so that it does not run out. Even queues have consequences – idling consumes gasoline that drivers have to pay to refuel more often.

Standing in line, LaKeena Crawford worried about the consequences for her 8-year-old daughter, who she saw trying to turn on the water.

“I’m like ‘No!’ Crawford said, adding that she wanted her daughter to understand that lead in water is dangerous. But, “I don’t want to scare him too much.”

Exposure to lead can slow cognitive development, especially in young children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and federal officials say no amount of lead in drinking water is considered safe for their consumption. In recent months, activists have pressed for more immediate and aggressive action, and the state has stepped up its response.

Some wonder if the problem would have been resolved more quickly if the residents of Benton Harbor were more like those of neighboring, predominantly white St. Joseph.

“Sometimes it’s enough to speak out against racism, and that’s what it feels like,” said Ambie Bell, helping distribute water to residents.

There are millions of aging underground lead lines connecting buildings to water pipes across the country, mostly in the Midwest, but also scattered across other states like New Jersey and Massachusetts. Old pipes can become an urgent risk to public health. Newark, New Jersey, experienced prolonged lead water problems which led to the rapid replacement of thousands of lead pipes. The high test results in Clarksburg, West Virginia, sounded the alarm earlier this year. The word Flint is now synonymous with lead water problems.

Digging up and replacing lead service lines is costly, straining tight local budgets. Infrastructure and reconciliation bills pending in Congress include billions to deal with leadline replacement which activists say could make a significant difference.

The lead water problem in Flint began when this town switched its water source to the Flint River as a temporary saving measure without proper treatment, corroding its lead pipes. But Benton Harbor’s water source, Lake Michigan, is considered safe and many other places find their water there, said City Manager Ellis Mitchell.

“Our problem is clearly our own infrastructure,” he said.

On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency identified a series of violations at the Benton Harbor water facility. Federal inspection has found problems so serious that the city must consider relinquishing ownership, the EPA said.

“The people of Benton Harbor have suffered for too long,” EPA administrator Michael Regan said in a statement.

Water systems sometimes produce high test results, but in Benton Harbor authorities have been unable to bring them down. The long-term solution is to replace the roughly 2,400 pipes that may contain lead, state officials said.

The city also lacks resources. Previous governors installed emergency managers with broad decision-making power that downsized, and the city’s population shrank, reducing its tax base.

“This results in a ripple effect of reduced technical, managerial and financial capacity at the water plant due to underinvestment in personnel, equipment and training,” said Scott Dean, Door -speaking of the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy.

After the Flint water crisis, Michigan tightened requirements for lead in drinking water in 2018, boasting that it passed the most protective law in the country. He imposed more stringent requirements for testing water for lead and demanded that old lead service lines be replaced.

Environmental groups and local activists filed a petition on Benton Harbor in September with the EPA, calling for aggressive action. Reverend Edward Pinkney, an activist named on the petition, said if they had not filed a request, an aggressive official response might have taken even longer.

“We couldn’t take it anymore,” said Pinkney.

The Michigan House of Representatives oversight committee held a hearing last month on Benton Harbor. Republican Committee Chairman Steven Johnson asked why the state’s recent response to the city’s main crisis makes it appear to have gone “from zero to 100 miles an hour” even though the problem has persisted for years.

Michigan officials say they have taken the issue seriously.

In 2019, local authorities offered Benton Harbor residents filters designed to reduce the amount of lead in drinking water. Eric Oswald, director of the state’s drinking water division, told the hearing that federal officials are studying the filters to make sure they are working properly. They also worked on controlling corrosion to reduce the amount of lead that enters drinking water through pipes. While the overall lead sampling results are still too high, the proportion of high readings has declined, officials said.

Additionally, outreach efforts from 2018 have included town halls, engagement with the local press, and public notices, officials said. Inspectors, however, hit the city for failing to notify water customers in their water bills of the problem over a one-year period.

Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician and professor at Michigan State University who sounded the alarm bells about Flint. She receives questions from parents to find out if a developmental problem could be related to lead in the water. However, it is extremely difficult to establish a direct link between an individual’s health problem and lead in water.

“This is why lead poisoning has eluded diagnosis, treatment and prevention for so long,” she said, adding that lead exposure is not safe for children and that ‘It’s too early to predict what the long-term impact might be. Lead levels can vary among households, and individuals may respond to exposure differently. The impact may also depend on other factors like poverty, which makes it particularly important to tackle the problem in cities like Benton Harbor, she said.

Marc A. Edwards, a professor at Virginia Tech who specializes in water treatment, said the focus on Benton Harbor highlights a national problem with cities struggling with high lead levels. He said major water crises like Flint erode public confidence in the official management of water systems.

Sylvester Bownes, who wears a prosthetic right leg, said he had been drinking bottled water for years because he didn’t trust the water in Benton Harbor.

Pushing a makeshift cart full of several cases of bottled water half a mile from his home, he said a broken water pipe temporarily cut off the public water supply, so no running water, he not only needed bottled water for drinking, but for basic needs like filling his toilet.

“Water is everything,” Bownes said. “It’s like gold.”

Residents confined to their homes can call a hotline for water, but Bownes said the process is taking too long and is unreliable. State officials said hundreds of people have been added to a list of weekly deliveries. If there are any issues, residents should report them, they said.

Mitchell, the city manager, said last month that customers are charged for water which authorities say can still be used for tasks such as laundry and washing up. He said the city was looking to see if there was any kind of relief about it.

At the Boys & Girls Club, volunteers distributed nearly 2,200 cases at noon.

Nelson, who has daughters of 12 and 14 and a 5-year-old son, said preparing dinner may require 15 to 20 bottles of water. “I hope they fix it soon,” she said.

Greg Johnson, who was the first to stop around 8:15 a.m., said he arrived early so his family’s supplies could be replenished for his daughters, aged 8 and 11.

“It takes two cases in the morning to get them ready for school,” he said. “They have to wash up and stuff. It’s a bit hectic. “

[ad_2]

]]>
Michigan County Official Resigns Over Public Health ‘Politicization’ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/#respond Sun, 24 Oct 2021 13:41:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/ [ad_1] ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits job in southwest Michigan. Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Head of Communications Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported. Davis ordered masks from […]]]>


[ad_1]

ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits job in southwest Michigan.

Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Head of Communications Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported.

Davis ordered masks from local schools to reduce the spread of COVID-19, although the order was dropped on September 29 when the Department of Health felt its public funding would be threatened. She said at the time that it was “appalling” that the money was tied to mask policies.

Davis said it was an honor to work for the department for almost five years.

“However, with the politicization of public health during the pandemic, I can no longer do my job effectively and serve the community with their health and safety always at the forefront,” she said.

A d

Davis’ last day is November 3.

Upon stepping down, Conrad said the pandemic had had a “significant impact” on his mental and physical health.

County administrator Brian Dissette said there had been only one candidate for the post of permanent health worker, a role Davis held on an interim basis.

He said he informed the state’s health department of the vacancies to try to add more “power horses” to the research.

Read more: Michigan Politics Headlines

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-official-resigns-over-public-health-politicization/feed/ 0
Michigan County Health Officer Resigns Over “Politicization of Public Health” https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:51:54 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/ [ad_1] item FILE – Children wear protective masks inside an elementary school classroom with separate desks for social distancing measures. ST. JOSEPH, Mich. – County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits his job in southwest Michigan. Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when […]]]>


[ad_1]

FILE – Children wear protective masks inside an elementary school classroom with separate desks for social distancing measures.

County health worker frustrated with “politicization of public health” during COVID-19 quits his job in southwest Michigan.

Courtney Davis has been an interim health worker in Berrien County since July, when she was promoted to assistant. Communications director Gillian Conrad is also resigning, The Herald-Palladium reported.

Davis ordered masks from local schools to reduce the spread of COVID-19, although the order was dropped on September 29 when the Department of Health felt its public funding would be threatened. She said at the time that it was “appalling” that the money was tied to mask policies.

Davis said it was an honor to work for the department for almost five years.

“However, with the politicization of public health during the pandemic, I can no longer do my job effectively and serve the community with their health and safety always at the forefront,” she said.

Davis’ last day is November 3.

Upon stepping down, Conrad said the pandemic had had a “significant impact” on his mental and physical health.

County administrator Brian Dissette said there had been only one candidate for the post of permanent health worker, a role Davis held on an interim basis.

He said he informed the state’s health department of the vacancies to try to add more “power” to the research.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-health-officer-resigns-over-politicization-of-public-health/feed/ 0
Southwest Michigan County Employee Charged With Embezzling $ 20,000 https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-county-employee-charged-with-embezzling-20000/ https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-county-employee-charged-with-embezzling-20000/#respond Mon, 30 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-county-employee-charged-with-embezzling-20000/ [ad_1] item FILE – Generic hammer on wooden table. ST. JOSEPH., Mich. – A Berrien County building and land maintenance worker has been charged with embezzlement and could face up to five years in prison, authorities said. Berrien County Building and Land Superintendent Joel Todd Johnson, 59, allegedly used county funds to purchase materials and […]]]>


[ad_1]

FILE – Generic hammer on wooden table.

A Berrien County building and land maintenance worker has been charged with embezzlement and could face up to five years in prison, authorities said.

Berrien County Building and Land Superintendent Joel Todd Johnson, 59, allegedly used county funds to purchase materials and tools for personal home construction and improvement jobs, according to the county prosecutor Steve Pierangeli.

Johnson was arrested on Friday. County officials said he was placed on unpaid administrative leave pending the outcome of an internal investigation.

The hijacking is said to have taken place from February to August of this year. The total cost alleged to have been purchased was $ 20,000.

“As county employees, we are accountable to our residents and our businesses and must be good stewards of the taxpayer money entrusted to us,” Berrien County Administrator Brian Dissette said in a release, according to WSJM in St. Joseph. “We expect all of our team members to operate at the highest ethical level at all times. We are fully cooperating with the judicial authorities and will demand the full return of any funds that may have been misappropriated.”

A message left for Johnson on Sunday was not immediately returned.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/southwest-michigan-county-employee-charged-with-embezzling-20000/feed/ 0
Michigan County Sheriff coordinated with Trump advisers to try to seize voting machines https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriff-coordinated-with-trump-advisers-to-try-to-seize-voting-machines/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriff-coordinated-with-trump-advisers-to-try-to-seize-voting-machines/#respond Fri, 02 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriff-coordinated-with-trump-advisers-to-try-to-seize-voting-machines/ [ad_1] A Michigan County sheriff with ties to far-right militias has sought to seize Dominion voting machines in cooperation with Donald Trump and the Republican Party’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results. In e-mail messages obtained by Michigan Bridge Through the Freedom of Information Act, Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf attempted late last […]]]>


[ad_1]

A Michigan County sheriff with ties to far-right militias has sought to seize Dominion voting machines in cooperation with Donald Trump and the Republican Party’s efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results.

In e-mail messages obtained by Michigan Bridge Through the Freedom of Information Act, Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf attempted late last year to enlist other county sheriffs in an illegal and unsuccessful attempt to “investigate all acts of electoral fraud ”by seizing and inspecting voting machines manufactured by Dominion Voting Systems of Denver, Colorado.

Sheriff Dar Leaf [Source: Michigan’s Sherrif Association]

Michigan Bridge said the “email finds” indicates that “Trump had at least some support from law enforcement in his attempt to overturn the 2020 election won by Democratic President Joe Biden.” Among Trump’s high-level contacts involved in Leaf’s communications were a liaison for former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and White House attorney Sidney Powell, who was leading bogus legal files alleging a electoral fraud by Democrats across the country.

The messages show that Dar Leaf has retained the services of Ann Arbor’s attorney, Carson Tucker, who in turn sent requests to Trump’s advisers asking for information that would justify the seizure of the voting machines. In a December 15 email to Carissa Keshel of the Fight Back Foundation, a nonprofit organization chaired by fascist lawyer L. Lin Wood, Tucker requested information on “potentially compromised counties” in the election. November 3.

In his request, Tucker claimed that the sheriffs of St. Joseph, Shiawassee, Lake and Jackson counties were “expressing interest” in the effort with Leaf. Tucker wrote: “My client Barry County Sheriff and several other Michigan County Sheriffs would like to consider issuing probable cause warrants to sequester Dominion voting machines if there is evidence of tampering.

In her response to Tucker on December 15, Keshel provided a document that she said came from Michael Flynn. Flynn, who has twice pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators during the FBI investigation into Russia, was pardoned by Trump after the 2020 election.

Keshel was referring to a report of electoral fraud in County Antrim, Michigan, writing: “Hello Carson and Dar, General Flynn wanted you to see the analysis of Antrim Forensics, and we believe all 48 counties are affected in the same way. I am in contact with the team so that we can coordinate our next steps with these Dominion machines.

Michigan Bridge also reported: “In an earlier November 20 email to Powell – who then filed unsuccessful lawsuits to overturn Trump’s losses in Michigan and other swing states – Carson Tucker claimed Leaf had already seized machinery to vote and ballots in Barry County. But that did not happen, according to local election officials and Leaf, who said Bridge he couldn’t remember why his lawyer had told Powell that was the case.

When Michigan Bridge contacted Leaf about the emails, he claimed he was working with other Michigan sheriffs on an “ongoing” case but would not discuss any details other than saying, “It’s our job to do. investigate all acts of electoral fraud. ” However, of the four sheriffs mentioned in Tucker’s letter, only Lake County Sheriff Rich Martin confirmed that Leaf spoke to him and told him Bridge that he never accepted the effort, saying he “didn’t want to be part of it.”

Martin also said Bridge that Leaf “does his thing a bit” and “I’m friends with him , so he usually calls me first for some of these things, but i have nothing to do with it.

Leaf belongs to a group of self-proclaimed “constitutional sheriffs” linked to far-right and fascist politics, including racist and xenophobic sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Ariz., Who was convicted of criminal contempt and then pardoned by Donald Trump. in August 2017. Members of the group argue that they are the highest level of government authority and have the power to disregard laws they deem unconstitutional.

In his comments to Bridge, Leaf said it was important that elected county law enforcement officials “exercise their authority” so that it is not “watered down.” He added: “It’s just about exploiting it and getting the sheriff’s office back on track and where it’s supposed to be.”

As Tucker’s letter to Keshel explained: “Constitutional sheriffs have a legal duty and duty to flush out criminal activity in the county on behalf of the citizens. And these are the main law enforcement officials.

The County Antrim “forensic audit report” that Keshel provided to Tucker and claimed to be from Flynn was prepared by a pro-Trump group called Allied Security Operations. The report claimed that the Dominion’s voting machines had a 68% error rate and were “intentionally and deliberately designed with inherent errors to create systemic fraud and influence election results.”

The findings were widely denounced by various independent sources, including former head of the Department of Homeland Security’s Cyber ​​and Infrastructure Security Agency Chris Krebs, who said at a Senate hearing in December that the report was “factually inaccurate”.

David Becker, executive director of the Center for Election Innovation and Research, described Leaf’s attempt to seize the voting machines with the support of Tucker and other members of the Trump camp as worthy of a “banana republic” and of a “phony dictator thing”. Becker also said: “Every person knew the rules of the election before the election, and trying to seize the voting machines in violation of federal law shows a fundamental disrespect for the rule of law.”

A profile of Dar Leaf has been posted here on the World Socialist Website last October, which reviews its close ties to right-wing and fascist organizations, including members of militias that plotted to kidnap and assassinate Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer last fall. In an interview with Fox17 in Grand Rapids, when Leaf was asked about the kidnapping plot, he said: “A lot of people are mad at the governor and they want her arrested.”

These new documents detail the coordination between Trump’s White House officials, Republican Party leaders and fascist Michigan individuals to overthrow the 2020 presidential election and show a widespread and continuing conspiracy against the U.S. Constitution. Culminating in the assault on the U.S. Capitol on Jan.6, claims of a stolen election continue, as Democrats do nothing to hold the Trump conspirator to account.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/michigan-county-sheriff-coordinated-with-trump-advisers-to-try-to-seize-voting-machines/feed/ 0
Monday, March 29, coronavirus data by Michigan county: Macomb, Genesee among 13 counties now above 15% positivity rate https://blissfield.net/monday-march-29-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-macomb-genesee-among-13-counties-now-above-15-positivity-rate/ https://blissfield.net/monday-march-29-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-macomb-genesee-among-13-counties-now-above-15-positivity-rate/#respond Mon, 29 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/monday-march-29-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-macomb-genesee-among-13-counties-now-above-15-positivity-rate/ [ad_1] Michigan now has 13 of its 83 counties with a positive rate of over 15% on average over seven days on coronavirus diagnostic tests. These counties include Macomb, Genesee, Lapeer and St. Clair. 6 reasons Michigan’s COVID-19 numbers are rising Statewide, the seven-day positivity rate on coronavirus diagnostic tests fell from 7.4% to 10.6% […]]]>


[ad_1]

Michigan now has 13 of its 83 counties with a positive rate of over 15% on average over seven days on coronavirus diagnostic tests.

These counties include Macomb, Genesee, Lapeer and St. Clair.

6 reasons Michigan’s COVID-19 numbers are rising

Statewide, the seven-day positivity rate on coronavirus diagnostic tests fell from 7.4% to 10.6% in the past week. The one-day rate was 11.8% for test results reported on Saturday.

The seven-day average of new daily cases fell from 2,482 to 3,965 over the past week.

Below is a more in-depth look at the county-level data, based on two of the metrics used by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

First, a look at the seven-day average positivity rates by county, grouped by state metric.

  • Level E (over 20%) eight counties: Huron, Sanilac, Otsego, St. Clair, Lapeer, Tuscola, Missaukee and Oscoda.
  • Level D (15-20%), five counties: Wexford, Macomb, Roscommon, Genesee and Crawford.
  • Level C (10-15%), 33 counties from highest to lowest: Hillsdale, Kalkaska, Allegan, Osceola, Eaton, Van Buren, Jackson, Antrim, Kalamazoo, Oceana, Ottawa, St Joseph, Presque Isle, Wayne, Ingham , Livingston, Barry, Clinton, Iosco, Bay, Monroe, Cass, Oakland, Muskegon, Shiawassee, Calhoun, Cheboygan, Montcalm, Newaygo, Saginaw, Berrien, Ontonagon and Lake.
  • Level B (7-10%): 17 counties, from highest to lowest: Kent, Gladwin, Mecosta, Grand Traverse, Midland, Lenawee, Branch, Leelanau, Benzie, Alcona, Arenac, Mason, Montmorency, Emmet, Alpena, Keweenaw and Ionia.
  • Level A (3-7%): 14 counties, from highest to lowest: Houghton, Manistee, Isabella, Clare, Mackinac, Ogemaw, Charlevoix, Dickinson, Gogebic, Delta, Gratiot, Chippewa, Marquette and Washtenaw,
  • Low (less than 3%): six counties, from highest to lowest: Luce, Iron, Menominee, Algiers, Baraga and Schoolcraft.

The graph below lets you search any county by name to see the seven-day average positivity rate from March 20 to 26. The graph compares the average of the last seven days to the average of the previous week.

The interactive map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. You can hover your cursor over a county to see the underlying data.

New cases per capita

Another metric used by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to access coronavirus risk is daily new cases per capita.

This measure calculates the average number of new cases per 1 million inhabitants.

Levels for each county:

  • Level E (over 150 cases per million): 65 counties, highest to lowest: Huron, Sanilac, St. Clair, Missaukee, Otsego, Macomb, Lapeer, Wexford, Jackson, Tuscola, Antrim, Oakland, Roscommon, Osceola , Eaton, Wayne, Livingston, Crawford, Genesee, Ingham, Bay, Kalkaska, Oscoda, Ottawa, Calhou, Montcalm, Cass, Kalamazoo, Midland, Shiawassee, Allegan, Monroe, Newaygo, Kent, Barry, Clinton, Presque Isle, Berrien, Cheboygan, Grand Traverse, Gladwin, Washtenaw, Van Buren, Saginaw, Mecosta, Hillsdale, Ionia, Lenawee, Chippewa, Ocean, Iosco, Lac, Mason, St. Joseph, Alcona, Houghton, Branche, Emmet, Leelanau, Isabella, Manistee, Clare, Muskegon, Alpena, Benzie and Gratiot.
  • Level D (70 to 149 cases per million): 15 counties: Arenac, Charlevoix, Keweenaw, Delta, Ontonagon, Mackinac, Dickinson, Ogemaw, Marquette, Baraga, Gogebic, Montmorency, Schoolcraft and Menominee.
  • Level C (40 to 69 cases per million): Luce and Iron.
  • Level B (20 to 40 cases per million): Algiers
  • Level A (7 to 20 cases per million): None.
  • Low (less than 7 cases per million): none.

Here is an online database that allows readers to see the number of new coronavirus cases in the past seven days compared to the previous week, as well as the number per capita that adjusts for the population. The arrows indicate whether the total number of new cases reported in the last seven days has increased or decreased compared to the previous seven days.

Current scores are based on new cases reported from March 21 to 27. The map below is shaded based on the six levels of state. Arrows indicate whether the total number of new cases reported in the past seven days has increased or decreased from March 14-20.

Readers can hover their cursor over a county to see the underlying data. (Tip: you can drag the map with your cursor to see the entire UP)

Below are online databases that allow readers to search county-level data for each of the past 30 days.

Overall score

Five MI Start regions in Michigan returned to level E in the state’s comprehensive risk assessment – the Detroit, Saginaw, Lansing, Kalamazoo, and Traverse City regions.

The Grand Rapids and Jackson areas are on level D and the Upper Peninsula is on level C.

In assigning risk scores, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services examines factors such as new cases and deaths per capita, test positivity rates, number of tests administered, and visits to medical services. emergency for symptoms of COVID-19. The scale used by the MDHHS has six levels: “low” plus the AE levels.

(State MI Start Districts: Region 1 is Region Detroit; Region 2 is Grand Rapids; Region 3, Kalamazoo; Region 4, Saginaw; Region 5, Lansing; Region 6, Traverse City; Region 7, Jackson, and Region 8, the Upper Peninsula.)

Cases daily it was reported to the State

The first is a graph showing new cases reported to the state each day for the past 30 days. This is based on when a confirmed coronavirus test is reported to the state, which means the patient first became ill a few days ago.

You can call up a chart for any county and you can hover your cursor over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

(In a few cases, a county reported a negative (decrease) number of new daily cases, as a result of retroactive reclassification by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. In these cases, we subtracted the cases from the date previous and put 0 in the date of the report.)

The following graph below shows new cases over the past 30 days based on symptom onset. In this graph, the numbers for the most recent days are incomplete due to the delay between people getting sick and getting a confirmed coronavirus test result, which can take up to a week or more.

You can call up a chart for any county and you can hover your cursor over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

For more data on COVID-19 in Michigan, visit https://www.mlive.com/coronavirus/data/.

Learn more about MLive:

Michigan’s COVID-19 numbers are rising at an “unsettling” rate. What is happening?

Gender gap in pandemic unemployment narrows, but mothers lag behind

When congregations can’t come together: pandemic forces Michiganders to rethink the church

FOX 2 Detroit anchor Maurielle Lue describes her “terrifying” COVID battle: “I literally can’t breathe”

COVID-19 cases in Michigan nursing homes drop 96%, deaths drop 99% since late December

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/monday-march-29-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-macomb-genesee-among-13-counties-now-above-15-positivity-rate/feed/ 0
Thursday, March 25, coronavirus data by Michigan county: State has 8 of the 20 worst counties in the United States https://blissfield.net/thursday-march-25-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-state-has-8-of-the-20-worst-counties-in-the-united-states/ https://blissfield.net/thursday-march-25-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-state-has-8-of-the-20-worst-counties-in-the-united-states/#respond Thu, 25 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/thursday-march-25-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-state-has-8-of-the-20-worst-counties-in-the-united-states/ [ad_1] Michigan has eight of the 20 US counties with the highest number of coronavirus cases per capita in the past week, according to The New York Times’ daily data analysis. The eight counties on the list and their national ranking: Huron (# 6), Otsego (# 7), Wexford (8), Sanilac (10), St. Clair (11), Missaukee […]]]>


[ad_1]

Michigan has eight of the 20 US counties with the highest number of coronavirus cases per capita in the past week, according to The New York Times’ daily data analysis.

The eight counties on the list and their national ranking: Huron (# 6), Otsego (# 7), Wexford (8), Sanilac (10), St. Clair (11), Missaukee (13), Jackson (17 ), Roscommon (19).

Of the 50 states, Michigan currently ranks second behind New Jersey for the seven-day average number of cases per capita.

6 reasons Michigan’s COVID-19 numbers are rising

Michigan has gone from an average of 2,073 new cases per day to 3,122 in the past seven days, a 51% increase.

Statewide, the seven-day positivity rate on coronavirus diagnostic tests fell from 6.4% to 8.7% in the past week. The one-day rate was 11.3% for test results reported on Wednesday.

Below is a more in-depth look at the county-level data, based on two of the metrics used by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

First, a look at the seven-day average positivity rates by county, grouped by state metric.

  • Level E (over 20%): Huron, Missaukee, St. Clair and Oscoda.
  • Level D (15-20%), seven counties: Lapeer, Otsego, Wexford, Roscommon, Tuscola, Crawford and Sanilac.
  • Level C (10-15%), 20 counties from highest to lowest: Macomb, Van Buren, Allegan, Kalkaska, Hillsdale, Cheboygan, Genesee, Osceola, Eaton, Branch, Wayne, Livingston, Cass, Kalamazoo, Berrien, Oakland , Ontonagon, Presque Isle, Shiawassee and Ingham.
  • Level B (7-10%): 19 counties, highest to lowest: Ottawa, Monroe, Calhoun, Clinton, Jackson, St Joseph, Antrim, Newaygo, Barry, Bay, Muskegon, Saginaw, Lake, Montcalm, Oceana, Midland, Gladwin, Kent and Benzie.
  • Level A (3-7%): 23 counties, from highest to lowest: Leelanau, Mecosta, Alcona, Lenawee, Grand Traverse, Clare, Mason, Houghton, Charlevoix, Arenac, Isabella, Emmet, Manistee, Alpena, Keweenaw, Dickinson, Gogebic, Ionia, Ogemaw, Iosco, Montmorency, Delta and Mackinac.
  • Low (less than 3%): 11 counties, highest to lowest: Marquette, Gratiot, Chippewa, Luce, Schoolcraft, Menominee, Iron, Alger and Baraga.

The graph below lets you search any county by name to see the seven-day average positivity rate from March 17 to 23. The graph compares the average of the last seven days to the average of the previous week.

The interactive map below shows the seven-day average testing rate by county. You can hover your cursor over a county to see the underlying data.

New cases per capita

Another metric used by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to access coronavirus risk is daily new cases per capita.

This measure calculates the average number of new cases per 1 million inhabitants.

Levels for each county:

  • Level E (over 150 cases per million): 60 counties, highest to lowest: Huron, Sanilac, St. Clair, Missaukee, Wexford, Otsego, Roscommon, Jackson, Lapeer, Macomb, Tuscola, Osceola, Crawford, Cheboygan , Antrim, Eaton, Oakland, Cass, Livingston, Ingham, Wayne, Calhoun, Van Buren, Genesee, Monroe, Allegan, Kalkaska, Ottawa, Kalamazoo, Shiawassee, Bay, Presque Isle, Clinton, Branch, Berrien, Midland, Houghton, Montcalm , Barry, Kent, Newaygo, Hillsdale, Oscoda, Lake, Grand Traverse, Keweenaw, Saginaw, Gladwin, Charlevoix, Lenawee, St. Joseph, Ontonagon, Leelanau, Isabella, Washtenaw, Emmet, Chippewa, Ionia, Mason and Alcona.
  • Level D (70 to 149 cases per million): 18 counties: Benzie, Oceana, Muskegon, Mecosta, Montmorency, Mackinac, Marquette, Alpena, Manistee, Delta, Gogebic, Clare, Baraga, Arenac, Iosco, Dickinson, Gratiot and Menominee.
  • Level C (40 to 69 cases per million): Ogemaw and Algiers.
  • Level B (20 to 40 cases per million): Luce and Schoolcraft.
  • Level A (7 to 20 cases per million): Iron
  • Low (less than 7 cases per million): none.

Here is an online database that allows readers to see the number of new coronavirus cases in the past seven days compared to the previous week, as well as the number per capita that adjusts for the population. The arrows indicate whether the total number of new cases reported in the last seven days has increased or decreased compared to the previous seven days.

Current scores are based on new cases reported from March 18 to 24. The map below is shaded based on the six levels of state. Arrows indicate whether the total number of new cases reported in the past seven days has increased or decreased from March 10-16.

Readers can hover their cursor over a county to see the underlying data. (Tip: you can drag the map with your cursor to see the entire UP)

Below are online databases that allow readers to search county-level data for each of the past 30 days.

Overall score

Five MI Start regions in Michigan returned to level E in the state’s comprehensive risk assessment – the Detroit, Saginaw, Lansing, Kalamazoo, and Traverse City regions.

The Grand Rapids and Jackson areas are on level D and the Upper Peninsula is on level C.

In assigning risk scores, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services examines factors such as new cases and deaths per capita, test positivity rates, number of tests administered, and visits to medical services. emergency for symptoms of COVID-19. The scale used by the MDHHS has six levels: “low” plus the AE levels.

(State MI Start Districts: Region 1 is Region Detroit; Region 2 is Grand Rapids; Region 3, Kalamazoo; Region 4, Saginaw; Region 5, Lansing; Region 6, Traverse City; Region 7, Jackson, and Region 8, the Upper Peninsula.)

Cases daily it was reported to the State

The first is a graph showing new cases reported to the state each day for the past 30 days. This is based on when a confirmed coronavirus test is reported to the state, which means the patient first became ill a few days ago.

You can call up a chart for any county and you can hover your cursor over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

(In a few cases, a county reported a negative (decrease) number of new daily cases, as a result of retroactive reclassification by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. In these cases, we subtracted the cases from the date previous and put 0 in the date of the report.)

The following graph below shows new cases over the past 30 days based on symptom onset. In this graph, the numbers for the most recent days are incomplete due to the delay between people getting sick and getting a confirmed coronavirus test result, which can take up to a week or more.

You can call up a chart for any county and you can hover your cursor over a bar to see the date and number of cases.

For more data on COVID-19 in Michigan, visit https://www.mlive.com/coronavirus/data/.

Learn more about MLive:

6 reasons Michigan’s COVID-19 numbers are rising

How to Find a COVID-19 Vaccination Appointment in Michigan

Pharmacies Help Increase Coronavirus Vaccines In Michigan

[ad_2]

]]>
https://blissfield.net/thursday-march-25-coronavirus-data-by-michigan-county-state-has-8-of-the-20-worst-counties-in-the-united-states/feed/ 0