university michigan – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 13:38:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://blissfield.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png university michigan – Blissfield http://blissfield.net/ 32 32 NCAA March Madness prepares for the return to normal https://blissfield.net/ncaa-march-madness-prepares-for-the-return-to-normal/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 11:21:03 +0000 https://blissfield.net/ncaa-march-madness-prepares-for-the-return-to-normal/ A general view of the March Madness logo prior to the game between the Syracuse Orange and the Houston Cougars in the Sweet Sixteen of the 2021 NCAA Tournament at Hinkle Fieldhouse. Aaron Doster | USA TODAY Sports | Reuters After two difficult and pandemic-disrupted years, the March madness we all know so well returns. […]]]>

A general view of the March Madness logo prior to the game between the Syracuse Orange and the Houston Cougars in the Sweet Sixteen of the 2021 NCAA Tournament at Hinkle Fieldhouse.

Aaron Doster | USA TODAY Sports | Reuters

After two difficult and pandemic-disrupted years, the March madness we all know so well returns.

The 2022 Men’s NCAA Tournament begins Thursday on CBS Sports and Turner Sports. Disney properties ABC and ESPN will air the women’s NCAA tournament starting on Friday.

Paramount Global and WarnerMedia executives spoke on Tuesday to promote March Madness, which promises to pour nearly $1 billion in ad revenue into the men’s side.

“The country is ready for the [NCAA] tournament,” CBS Sports President Sean McManus said.

“We’re back to normal,” added Turner Sports President Lenny Daniels. “And we want to take that and go further.”

The networks lost the 2020 NCAA tournament due to Covid. The 2021 event took place in a bubble and saw the Baylor Bears claim their first NCAA men’s basketball championship.

But this year’s tournament will feature the return of legendary Duke and Kentucky programs — both missed last year’s tournament — and legendary coach Mike Krzyzewski chasing his last title with the Blue Devils.

Can the men’s tournament attract 20 million viewers?

The production of this year’s NCAA tournament isn’t changing too much. Games will once again feature a virtual on-field timer. There will be in-game coaching interviews and Final Four matches will see rail and aerial cameras integrated into the broadcasts.

But will there be more viewers than last year?

The 2021 NCAA Championship game between undefeated Gonzaga and Baylor averaged 16.9 million viewers for CBS Sports, a 14% drop from the 2019 game. It was also the least-watched championship aired on CBS since the network began airing the games in 1982 .

The 2021 Men’s Final Four matches averaged 14.9 million viewers.

The NCAA Men’s Tournament returns to Turner Sports this year for the first time since 2018, when Villanova defeated the University of Michigan. This title match drew around 16.5 million viewers.

CBS and Turner have been running the Final Four since 2016. The last time the NCAA Men’s Championship game topped 20 million was in 2017 when the University of North Carolina took on Gonzaga. This game attracted about 22 million viewers.

On Tuesday’s call, McManus reportedly wouldn’t predict viewership around the 2022 tournament, but added “good games, good storylines, and as we know, when a Cinderella shows up, it’s good for ratings.

He also noted that bigger programs returning to the tournament should help the viewership. In addition, the measurement company Nielsen will combine Outside the house hearing with the final measures. Out-of-home TVs are counted in places like airports, restaurants, and sports bars. Nielsen previously only provided in-home measurements for its linear television reporting.

McManus said Nielsen’s decision to combine the metrics is “good for the network and good for our sponsors, and it really provides an accurate count of how many people are consuming our content.”

On the women’s side, Disney is hoping to top last year’s title match between Arizona and Stanford. The pageant averaged 4 million viewers and has been the most-watched women’s pageant since 2014.

The 2021 women’s semifinals with Stanford and South Carolina averaged 1.6 million viewers, while the University of Connecticut’s loss to Arizona drew 2.6 million viewers, up by 24% compared to the second semi-final of 2019. Sweet 16 games broadcast on ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 averaged 918,000 viewers, an increase of 67% compared to 2019.

A detailed view of the March Madness logo on center court as Gonzaga Bulldogs and Norfolk State Spartans players run during the second half of the first round of the 2021 NCAA Tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse.

Kirby Lee | USA TODAY Sports | Reuters

March Madness commercials are sold out

Advertising inventory around the 2022 men’s tournament has run out, said John Bogusz, executive vice president of CBS Network’s sales division. Thirty-second spots for the tournament range from hundreds of thousands of dollars in earlier rounds to over $2 million for the NCAA title game.

Bogusz said the automotive, insurance and fast food categories are “very active and very strong this year.” Movie studios are also returning to rotating ads, while travel and tech companies will also promote around games.

TV Ad Measurement Company I spot ad spend estimates around the 2021 men’s basketball tournament were around $1.05 billion, a 21.4% increase from the 2019 tournament. The company told CNBC that AT&T was the biggest spender with $74.7 million on ads around the 2021 tournament. Capital One spent $48.7 million on ads, Geico ($46.7 million), Buick ($39.5 million dollars) and Progressive ($37.7 million).

Briefed on the estimates and asked if ad spend around the 2022 men’s tournament would top $1 billion, Bogusz didn’t reveal details, but added the projection was “within range.”

“It’s pretty impressive,” Turner Sports chief revenue officer Jon Diament said, referring to ad spend. Diament noted the time the networks have to deliver the games – “three weeks of activity…it’s pretty remarkable that we can gobble up that money in just three weeks of flying.”

Last September, the NCAA declared the 2022 NCAA Women’s Tournament to be included in the March Madness brand. The decision has come after mounting pressure and criticism on the organization’s initial stance on using the brand only for the men’s tournament.

EPSN said he also sold his inventory for the women’s tournament. Twenty-two advertisers, including Apple, General Motors, Target and T-Mobile, will run ads during the games.

The sports program advertising market remains a top buy for advertisers. The National Football League Super Bowl remains the most expensive inventory. CNBC’s parent company, NBCUniversal, billed about $6.5 million for Super Bowl 56 ads, and some brands paid a record $7 million for a 30-second ad.

Yet the high prices of sports programs do not deter companies. Bogusz said “advertisers in all demo groups are allocating extra dollars” to buy inventory.

“It’s the best drama series in all of television, and for many advertisers, it’s still the most engaging programming you can have,” McManus said. “And that includes the NCAA Tournament.”

When asked if the NCAA Men’s Tournament will increase to $3 million per 30 seconds when CBS returns to the event in 2023, Bogusz replied, “I wouldn’t say it would be that high. But we plan to increase prices as we continue to move forward.

Demonstrators protest against the war in Ukraine in front of the Brandenburg Gate.

Kay Nietfeld/photo alliance via Getty Images

War contingency plans

As the networks welcome a return to normalcy for March Madness, contingency plans are in place to update major news at the moment – Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“There are bigger things going on in the world right now than the NCAA Tournament,” McManus said. “No one will claim that the action on the ground is as important as the life and death action that is taking place in Ukraine,” he added.

McManus referenced the invasion of Iraq in March 2003 to explain how the network would approach coverage. He said the networks would update the war in Ukraine as needed and “handle it in the best possible way”.

“We have two of the best production companies and two of the best news agencies,” Daniels added, referring to CBS News and CNN. “I think we will make the right decisions.”

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In a Michigan town, environmental justice is passing a critical test https://blissfield.net/in-a-michigan-town-environmental-justice-is-passing-a-critical-test/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 16:19:11 +0000 https://blissfield.net/in-a-michigan-town-environmental-justice-is-passing-a-critical-test/ Dabout 10 to 15 minutes north of downtown Detroit and you can drive through Hamtramck, Michigan, a town of about 2 square miles that is home to many communities of color, including Yemeni and Bangladeshi immigrants and African Americans. Here, in a region where nearly 70% of households speak a language other than English, a […]]]>

Dabout 10 to 15 minutes north of downtown Detroit and you can drive through Hamtramck, Michigan, a town of about 2 square miles that is home to many communities of color, including Yemeni and Bangladeshi immigrants and African Americans. Here, in a region where nearly 70% of households speak a language other than English, a case of environmental injustice is unfolding – a microcosm of national efforts to advance health equity for generations to come.

More than 2,000 of Hamtramck’s approximately 22,000 residents live within a half-mile radius of the US Ecology Detroit North waste management facility, which processes and stores toxic heavy metals and other toxic waste produced by entities business and government. Over the years, the facility has accumulated an uneven record of environmental safety compliance. In 2016, the Detroit Free Press obtained records showing the company had racked up 150 wastewater violations since 2010, for offenses that included discharging water containing excessive levels of toxic mercury and arsenic into the system. city ​​sewer. In 2017, independent testing of public lands surrounding the facility found soil samples containing arsenic, a known carcinogen, at levels nearly 20 times above the EPA’s safe limit. (The facility has long-standing waivers that exempt it from groundwater and soil monitoring.)

Several years ago, as locals began to hear of an expansion project that would increase the site’s chemical waste storage capacity ninefold and enable it to process 30 new categories of hazardous waste, including carcinogenic aflatoxins , local activists cried foul. They filed petitions and organized demonstrations, to no avail. In 2020, after delaying its final decision and extending the public comment period, the Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, the state agency that oversees hazardous waste management, approved expansion of the facility.

A battle to protect Hamtramck residents is currently being waged by the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, which has filed a formal grievance with EGLE’s Non-Discrimination Compliance Coordinator. The Coordinator reviews Title VI complaints in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations. In addition to violating this regulation, the legal center alleges that the decision to issue the expanded license to the US Ecology Facility also constitutes discrimination under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. The grievance notes that 80% of residents within a 3-mile radius of the site are people of color.

Lawyers argue that although EGLE provided public notice of the proposed expansion, the agency did not make those notices available in the appropriate languages ​​to the many Arabic and Bengali-speaking immigrants who live near the establishment. Moreover, according to the complaint, public hearings that had been promised to be accessible in the language, at the request of residents and grassroots organizations, ultimately were not. EGLE has since released a Limited English Proficiency Plan that outlines steps the agency will take to comply with federal civil rights law and public notice requirements going forward.

Meaningful language access to legally mandated environmental information disclosures is a key component of many EPA discrimination-related regulations and complaints. But another, perhaps deeper, criticism in Hamtramck’s grievance relates to a concept that has become a permanent point of contention in environmental regulation: an idea known as cumulative risk.

A large body of research in disciplines such as toxicology and social epidemiology has demonstrated that environmental pollutants can act in conjunction with each other and that a person’s health can be negatively affected by the accumulation of risks. for health throughout his life. The nature of these risks extends beyond toxic chemical and biological exposures; Stressful socio-economic conditions, often prevalent among people of color, also pose risks to human health. These factors may act cumulatively or even synergistically with environmental toxicants to exacerbate the risk of adverse health effects.

There are reasons to believe that such cumulative risks could be disproportionate in the communities of Hamtramck and its surroundings. The city is characterized by high population density and poverty rates, two factors associated with a high incidence of chronic diseases. The predominantly black areas of metro Detroit already face high volumes of industrial pollution and have some of the highest asthma rates in the country. In Hamtramck, many Bangladeshi and Yemeni immigrants had to endure both chemical exposure and social toxicity. In addition to ongoing xenophobic and Islamophobic discrimination, some Yemeni immigrants still suffer from the psychological and biological effects of forced displacement from their home country, a war-torn nation where violence, starvation and disease are commonplace. These comorbidities and social stressors would likely be amplified by additional exposure to environmental pollution.

Additionally, Bangladeshi immigrants to the United States come from a country that has one of the highest levels of arsenic groundwater contamination in the world, and many have brought their farming traditions to Detroit, where they depend of urban agriculture. They may fear the cumulative toll that continued exposure to arsenic in groundwater and soil could have on their health.

The predominantly black areas of metro Detroit already face high volumes of industrial pollution and have some of the highest asthma rates in the country.

In its grievance against EGLE, the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center argues that the agency should have assessed these cumulative risks before approving the expansion of the US Ecology Detroit North site. Plaintiffs argue that Michigan’s continued licensing of polluters who contribute to Hamtramck’s disproportionate burden of health risks is, in itself, discriminatory.

However, there are few federal mechanisms to require state and local agencies to consider cumulative risk when reviewing permit applications. EPA has spent the past year developing long-awaited updates to its framework for planning and performing cumulative risk assessments, with the goal of encouraging more focused state licensing decisions. on health, but the guidelines are not legally binding. The National Environmental Policy Act requires cumulative risk assessments only for facilities that receive federal funding, a category that excludes facilities such as US Ecology’s Detroit-North site. (Even for facilities subject to the guidance law, the law does not actually require states to base their decisions on the results of cumulative risk assessments.)

In the absence of a federal mandate, cumulative risk assessments are not standard in most state environmental regulations. This may be partly because implementing and applying cumulative risk assessments at the state level requires significant investments of time and resources: stakeholders must agree on all aspects of these complex analyses, of the types of stressors that a risk assessment must take into methodology to estimate how a new activity might increase risk at the population level.

Yet these obstacles have not prevented some states from formally integrating cumulative risk assessment into their environmental protection laws. Some states limit these laws to certain types of broadcasts; New York, for example, applies cumulative risk assessments for air pollution. But other states, such as Massachusetts and Minnesota, have adopted broader cumulative risk measures and include community engagement mechanisms. The Hamtramck case illustrates why it is so important that more states follow their lead.

The outcome of the grievance filed on behalf of the residents of Hamtramck is still pending. But it seems clear: Decades of science have shown that the health risks of environmental pollution, especially in marginalized communities, cannot be measured in toxicity levels alone. Until lawmakers formally codify this principle into law, environmental justice will continue to prove elusive for marginalized communities like those in Hamtramck.


Farah Kader is a New York-based research analyst. She holds a BA in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley and an MPH in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of Michigan.

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Michigan ends perfect home season with win over Michigan State https://blissfield.net/michigan-ends-perfect-home-season-with-win-over-michigan-state/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 02:20:13 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-ends-perfect-home-season-with-win-over-michigan-state/ History links Highlights vs. Michigan State Photo gallery Next game: in Iowa 02/27/2022 | 3:00 p.m. CT ESPN2 February 27 (Sunday) / 3:00 p.m. CT at Iowa Michigan trailed up to nine points in the first half […]]]>

Michigan trailed up to nine points in the first half before coming back to tie the game at halftime. UM scored the first four points of the third quarter and never trailed again.
» Naz Hillmon paced the Wolverines again, getting 28 points, eight rebounds, two assists and one block.
» The senior class of Hillmon, Amy Dick, Emilie Kiser and Danielle Rauch was honored before the game.

To place: Ann Arbor, Michigan (Crisler Center)

Goal: #6 Michigan 62, Michigan State 51

Recordings: UM (22-4, 13-3 B1G), MSU (14-13, 8-8 B1G)

Next UM event: Sunday, February 27 – at Iowa (Iowa City, Iowa), 3 p.m. CST

ANN ARBOUR, Mich. — The No. 6-ranked University of Michigan women’s basketball team overcame a slow start, using a 10-0 run to start the fourth quarter en route to a 62-51 win over Michigan. Michigan State Thursday night (February 24) at Crisler Center. The win capped a 14-0 home season for the Wolverines, the first unbeaten home season in program history.

Naz Hillmon led all players with 28 points, including 17 in the first half – more than half of Wolverines’ total points (32) before halftime. Maddie Nolan and Emilie Kiser each added eight runs and Kiser paced Michigan with nine boards. Amy Dick had six assists and three steals to lead the defensive effort.

UM got off to a slow start, trailing up to nine in the first quarter before slowly climbing back to lose only 14-10 after the opening 10 minutes.

Michigan cut the Spartans’ lead to just two after Hillmon scored on the opening possession of the second quarter, but MSU continued to respond as the teams traded buckets for several minutes.

Nolan hit back-to-back triples to cap an 8-0 Michigan run that pushed the Wolverines past the Spartans for the first time all game, 28-26, with 4:14 left in the second quarter. Neither team led by more than two points the rest of the period, trading baskets the rest of the way.

UM came back in front with a pair of free throws from Cameron Williams on his last possession, but Michigan State answered with a pair of his own to send the teams to the locker room tied at 32.

Michigan scored the first four points of the third quarter, getting buckets from Hillmon and Kiser to break the halftime tie. UM pushed their lead to six on a Kiser shot to beat the shot clock with 5:40 to go.

A drive-thru layup from Spartans’ Nia Clouden put Michigan State within two, 44-42, with 1:45 left in the third quarter, but a timely jump shot from a freshman Laila Phelia quickly restored Michigan to a four-point lead. MSU’s offense was stifled from then on as UM held the Spartans to just one field goal in the fourth quarter.

Michigan opened the fourth on a 10-0 run to put the game away. UM got consecutive buckets from Phelia, Kiser and Danielle Rauchforcing an MSU timeout at 7:50 as UM’s lead went into double digits for the first time, 54-44.

The timeout didn’t stop the run as four consecutive free throws from Hillmon and Nolan capped the push with 6:21 left and UM leading 14, 58-44. The lead stayed in double digits the rest of the way as UM took the win.

Michigan will wrap up the regular season on Sunday, Feb. 27, by traveling to Iowa to face the 21st-ranked Hawkeyes at 3 p.m. CST. The game will be broadcast live on ESPN2.

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After 18 years, Michigan city condemns ‘Jewish Power Corrupts’ protests as anti-Semitic https://blissfield.net/after-18-years-michigan-city-condemns-jewish-power-corrupts-protests-as-anti-semitic/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 18:13:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/after-18-years-michigan-city-condemns-jewish-power-corrupts-protests-as-anti-semitic/ ANN ARBOR, Mich. (JTA) — For the past 18 years, a group of protesters have gathered outside one of this city’s synagogues every Saturday during Shabbat morning services, holding signs with slogans such as “Jewish Power Corrupts “. This week, the Ann Arbor City Council for the first time issued a formal resolution condemning the […]]]>

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (JTA) — For the past 18 years, a group of protesters have gathered outside one of this city’s synagogues every Saturday during Shabbat morning services, holding signs with slogans such as “Jewish Power Corrupts “.

This week, the Ann Arbor City Council for the first time issued a formal resolution condemning the protests as anti-Semitic.

The resolution responds to calls from members of the Beth Israel Congregation, a conservative synagogue a few blocks from the University of Michigan’s Hillel Center, as well as neighbors of the synagogue. They have called on the city for years to take decisive action against protesters, who they say target Jews at a place of worship and harass community members.

The protesters’ stated aim is to criticize Israel’s policies, but members of the group frequently bring anti-Semitic signs and chant anti-Semitic slogans. The group’s de facto leader, Henry Herskovitz, identifies as a former Jew and has propagated Holocaust denial and praised neo-Nazis in blog posts.

A worshiper, in addition to a local Holocaust survivor, sued protesters and the city in 2019, alleging that the protests violate First Amendment worshipers’ rights to practice their religion safely and that the city does not failed to enforce local ordinances that protesters are violating. That lawsuit was dismissed in September after the US Court of Appeals ruled that protesters had the right to speak freely to continue their activities.

For years, the city refused to get involved in what was happening on Washtenaw Avenue. That changed at Tuesday’s city council meeting, three days after a rabbi and his followers were taken hostage during services by an anti-Semitic attacker in Texas.

“The Ann Arbor City Council condemns all forms of anti-Semitism, and in particular the weekly anti-Semitic rally on Washtenaw Avenue,” states the resolution, which was unanimously approved by all voting members of the council. The resolution also “calls on people who gather to express their anti-Semitism on Washtenaw Avenue to renounce extremism, disband, and cease their weekly display of aggressive bigotry.”

The council “further declares its support for Congregation Beth Israel, its guests, and all members of the Ann Arbor Jewish community, each having the right to pray, gather, and celebrate free from intimidation, harassment, and fear. violence”.

Congregation Beth Israel in Ann Arbor, Michigan has been the site of a weekly anti-Israel protest since 2003. (WIkimedia Commons via JTA)

“I was just thrilled,” Rabbi Beth Israel Nadav Caine told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, noting that following the failure of the lawsuit that directly targeted the city, “it would be a lot easier not to do anything. say… I really thought it was bravery and an awareness on their part, that in this era, leaders have to speak out about the hate that happens to people who are not part of their group.

Caine had moved to Ann Arbor in 2018 after serving as a rabbi in Poway, Calif. — the site of a fatal 2019 anti-Semitic shooting at a Chabad home. Seeing the council’s resolution come just three days after the Colleyville, Texas synagogue hostage-taking, Caine said, “was the yin-yang of extreme emotions.”

The hostage-taking captured the world’s attention and renewed attention to anti-Semitic threats against Jewish places of worship. The rabbi held hostage in Texas, Charlie Cytron-Walker, is himself a graduate of the University of Michigan.

But the resolution, which did not mention events in Texas but referenced anti-Semitic signs seen on the U.S. Capitol during the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection attempt, had actually been in the works for months, Caine said. Most notably, he said, it was led by the mayor of Ann Arbor himself.

“It doesn’t come from, say, ‘Jewish friends,'” Caine said, adding that he and the congregation were careful not to appear to fit the “Jewish stereotype of the person forcing my leaders to do something.” that they don’t want”. To do. In fact, that’s kind of what we’re accused of, that is, of using “Jewish power”.

Called for comment, Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor said he did not recall the resolution’s exact origins, but that it came out of “conversations” with the Ann Arbor Conference. He said the city issued a proclamation against the group in 2004, before he became mayor, but a 2021 resolution condemning anti-Asian harassment ‘resurfaced’ a desire to issue something more forcefully against this group.

Taylor has previously spoken out against the protests and visited the synagogue to apologize directly to congregants.

The protesters “express anti-Semitic tropes, they peddle a conspiracy, and their goal is to disrupt an innocent congregation,” he told JTA. “It’s totally inconsistent with Ann Arbor’s values, period.”

But, Taylor said, the city had little power to take further action against them. “People have the right to gather on public sidewalks and talk there,” he said. “We can’t intervene if anyone’s First Amendment law intervenes.”

Caine said Ann Arbor, a college town with a long history of progressive politics and left-wing social movements, tends to look the other way when Jews are targeted.

“We felt like, really — not just to me — Ann Arbor was no place for hate, except for hating Jews,” he said.

Rabbi Nadav Caine of Congregation Beth Israel in Ann Arbor speaks in support of a city council resolution condemning weekly protests outside his synagogue as anti-Semitic, while behind him another protester displays an anti-Israel sign, 18 January 2022. (Screenshot via JTA)

But the synagogue believed the city would take a stand, which is part of why Beth Israel refused to get involved in its own congregation’s lawsuit, Caine said.

“We had to consciously ask ourselves: ‘Is the city our enemy?’ “, did he declare. “We have to understand that they are not.”

Ann Arbor city council meetings have themselves been regular venues for local anti-Israel activists, who observers say often cross the line into anti-Semitism. Even at Tuesday’s meeting in which the resolution passed, a group during the public comment period held up an anti-Israel sign in front of the city council camera behind Caine; synagogue president Deborah Loewenberg Ball; and Eileen Freed, executive director of the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann Arbor, as they spoke in support of the resolution.

Activists also chanted “Stop shooting Palestinians! after each Jewish speaker has completed their remarks.

These Ann Arbor residents, who frequently push the city council to pass anti-Israel resolutions, also join forces with protesters at the Beth Israel Synagogue. Local anti-Israel campaigner, environmental toxicologist Mozhgan Savabieasfahani, recently declared her intention to run for city council after an unsuccessful 2020 run in which she singled out Jewish donors from her opponents in social media posts. .

While Caine expects protesters to continue with their weekly actions, he said the city’s statement will still be of great help to the congregation.

“When you enter the synagogue, there is a brochure explaining what is going on outside,” he said. “So what I can add now is, ‘I want you to know this doesn’t represent Ann Arbor'” – then, he said, he will quote the resolution.

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Michigan State University, UM will require COVID booster injections https://blissfield.net/michigan-state-university-um-will-require-covid-booster-injections/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 19:43:15 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-state-university-um-will-require-covid-booster-injections/ [ad_1] The MSU requirement affects approximately 70,000 people who are employed by MSU or who are enrolled in courses. Related: According to a letter sent Friday by MSU President Samuel Stanley, students, staff and faculty who received their two-dose COVID vaccines more than six months ago, or a single-dose regimen more than six months ago. […]]]>


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The MSU requirement affects approximately 70,000 people who are employed by MSU or who are enrolled in courses.

Related:

According to a letter sent Friday by MSU President Samuel Stanley, students, staff and faculty who received their two-dose COVID vaccines more than six months ago, or a single-dose regimen more than six months ago. of two months, are eligible for a booster and should arrange to get the jab before class resumes on January 10, after the holidays.

“Those who do not receive a booster when eligible will be considered not to meet MSU’s vaccination guidelines,” Stanley wrote. “You can find a vaccine booster near you by visiting our Together We Will website. “

MSU required proof of COVID vaccination for the current fall semester. About 91 percent of students are vaccinated, according to data collected by the university, with a rate similar to the University of Michigan. With many universities requiring vaccinations, the COVID outbreaks that were common on campuses in fall 2020 were almost non-existent this fall.

In November, MSU laid off two employees and suspended 16 students for not following the school’s COVID policies.

Some students, staff and faculty have approved exemptions. Those currently benefiting from exemptions will continue to be exempt from the recall requirement.

All students, staff and faculty will continue to be required to wear face coverings inside campus buildings.

“Data from the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that COVID-19 boosters help broaden and strengthen protection against Omicron and other variants and will be essential for continued learning and development. in-person operations, ”Stanley wrote. “We know our COVID-19 guidelines are aimed at mitigating the spread of the virus, and this is an important next step. “

In a recent separate statement on the university’s response to the pandemic, Stanley said, “I know the past 20 months have been difficult for many of us, and I realize that we all wish this pandemic be behind us. But it does not, and we will continue to make decisions based on our commitment to health and safety. “

Both universities have referred to concerns about the omicron variant in their statements. UM said the omicron variant “has been detected within the UM community”.

In-person classes begin in Ann Arbor on January 5, and students, staff, and faculty have until February 4 to get the extra shot.

There will be strengthened testing protocols for MU students living on campus, and students will be required to wear masks in common areas of residences, regardless of their immunization status.

The start of winter for UM graduate students will continue as planned on December 19, with everyone required to wear masks.

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Michigan state football signatory Alex VanSumeren possesses a power of a rare kind https://blissfield.net/michigan-state-football-signatory-alex-vansumeren-possesses-a-power-of-a-rare-kind/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 11:12:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-state-football-signatory-alex-vansumeren-possesses-a-power-of-a-rare-kind/ [ad_1] ESSEXVILLE, MI – Before even knowing what the will was, Alex VanSumeren was gushing about it. No mission has ever been too difficult, too trying or too tiring to accomplish. And so the new Michigan State University soccer player was able to learn to throw with the left hand just for a shot at […]]]>


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ESSEXVILLE, MI – Before even knowing what the will was, Alex VanSumeren was gushing about it.

No mission has ever been too difficult, too trying or too tiring to accomplish.

And so the new Michigan State University soccer player was able to learn to throw with the left hand just for a shot at taking the Little League mound at the age of 12.

“He had arm issues that year so he worked with his dad in the backyard all season, learning to throw with his other hand,” said Nate Volk, who coached VanSumeren in the Harpham Chiropractic Team at Bay City Southwest Little League.

“The other kids were laughing when he took the mound. He was wearing a left handed glove and he looked awesome on him. And that was a good team that we were up against, a team that kicked the ball all over the place – and he took them out 1-2-3. No one was laughing after the first batter.

“If he had come out and collapsed face down, it’s still the thought that counts. And the dedication and effort that goes into it is what Alex is all about.

When VanSumeren decided to become a Division I college football player, few who knew about the Essexville Garber phenomenon considered it an impossible ambition. With his will, there has always been a way.

With the left hand that went on strike after an unlikely strike as a strong-minded Little Leaguer in 2016, VanSumeren wrote his signature on the national letter of intent that officially made him part of the MSU football program.

The 6-foot-3, 300-pound defensive lineman invited a small group to Tank Elite Performance, the Saginaw training center where VanSumeren has been training since eighth grade, for his signing ceremony on Wednesday.

After completing the Garber graduation requirement in four days of school, he plans to move to East Lansing as the first enrolled in the state of Michigan. There, he will unite with his big brother Ben VanSumeren, linebacker in his first year with the Spartans.

And a new mission begins for Alex VanSumeren.

Best recruits

VanSumeren became one of the nation’s top defensive linemen during his four-year college career with the Garber Dukes.

He made 48 saves with 11 tackles for loss as a senior, harassing the quarterback for 28 carries and six sacks while winning the All-State First Team for the third year in a row. He is a two-time MLive Bay City Defensive Player of the Year and became the first player in Golden Helmet’s 57-year history to win four weekly honors.

This season has not gone as well as expected for VanSumeren and the Dukes. Garber ended the season on a three-game losing streak and came out 5-5 and VanSumeren has missed most of the last three games with a shoulder injury. He failed to match his junior season’s production as opponents increasingly turned to the DI prospect.

“At this point in your career, teams are going to plan for you, plan for you,” he said. “You’re going to see doubles and trebles, but you can still have an impact on the game. If you take blockers and someone else makes the game, you’ve done your job.

“(Double-team blocking) was kind of a thing every game, every game. It gets frustrating, but you have to understand that they don’t do this to everyone, so I see that as a mark of respect to me as a player.

Garber’s Alex VanSumeren (21) heads to the locker room ahead of a game against John Glenn on Friday, October 8, 2021.Boomer Kaytie | MLive.com

Through it all, VanSumeren’s training program has become legendary. He has occasionally posted videos on social media of his passing stroke drills and behind-the-scenes work on form and technique. He also enjoys “breaking weights” as a workout demon.

“It’s certainly not easy, but I’m disciplined enough to know that’s what I need to do,” he said. “You cannot be indulgent with yourself, and it takes a lot of effort and concentration. “

As a result, VanSumeren rose to No. 26 nationwide in 247Sports.com’s defensive lineman rankings in the class of 2022. He has received scholarship offers from heavy hitters such as Alabama, Clemson, Auburn. , Texas A&M, Penn State, Stanford and Suite.

After initially giving a verbal pledge to Jim Harbaugh and the University of Michigan, he changed courses last winter and landed at Michigan State. When he officially signed with the Spartans on Wednesday, it capped a trip of many years in the making.

Grass roots

VanSumeren’s sports resume started out old-fashioned, playing in the yard and aisle with his big brother. Cindy and Jeff VanSumeren’s sons were both highly skilled – and highly competitive – at a young age.

“I bought them a video game system when they were little and it sat in a box for a year before I put it in and plug it in,” VanSumeren said. “They were always out doing something.”

In a family that emphasizes moral values ​​such as faith and a work ethic – dad is a police officer and mum is an educator – Alex learned early on that he was meant to earn everything he had. Trying to follow a brother who is three and a half years old has helped to make this point clear.

Alex Van Sumeren

Alex VanSumeren is heading for a season of high expectations at Essexville Garber.

“They had a backyard football league and I could see the pitch through our back window,” said Jeff VanSumeren. “I stayed in the house and took care of Alex because he was three or four years younger than the other children. He took his licks, but he also served them.

Alex said he hadn’t spent his entire youth in a headache, but Ben hasn’t been kind to him either.

“He was a really good influence on me, a good role model,” Alex said. “He’s been tough on me and he’s always been very competitive. It all really helped me along the way.

Like Ben, Alex excelled playing basketball at Zion Lutheran in elementary and middle school, playing football in the Bay Area Youth Football League and with the Essexville Jags, and playing baseball at the Southwest Little League. .

Not just the big kid, VanSumeren played point guard, running back and shortstop, displaying top athleticism. But he also displayed a rare level of determination to do things that many thought were unlikely.

Learning to throw for a left-handed person is the perfect illustration of this.

“Just athletically to be able to do this is remarkable, but having the dedication to do it is what sets him apart,” said Volk, who witnessed the VanSumeren signing wearing his 2016 Harpham Chiropractic baseball cap.

“He’s the only kid I remember at that age who never took a moment’s rest. He tried hard all the time, aspiring every moment to try to improve himself.

Mission accomplished

Between the highlights of college basketball in 2017, VanSumeren typed his first “recruiting” post on Twitter. After Ben in Missouri, he posed for a photo wearing a Mizzou uniform.

It wouldn’t be long before these recruiting trips were his and his college football mission began.

Alex Van Sumeren

Essexville Garber coach Jake Coquillard stands alongside Alex VanSumeren after signing with Michigan State University football team.

Seeing Ben’s experience, a seed was planted in Alex’s head that ‘this is what I do,’ said Jeff VanSumeren. ‘You kind of take it with a grain of salt, but then it starts to progress and all of a sudden it’s a reality and it’s here.

“You want your kids to be passionate about something, to set goals and to work. And I hope these dreams will be achieved. The difference between dreams and reality is taking action, and they both did it – alone. They were never pushed by me or Cindy. It is not something that we have ever considered for them.

But Alex had big plans for himself and he laid the foundation for his lofty goals with a work ethic, passion and will that have long distinguished him.

“When he was playing in the backyard – and that’s where it all came from – it was always ‘One more’,” said Jeff VanSumeren. “Whether I was hitting him a ball or throwing a ball at him, it was always ‘One more, daddy.’ If I had a dime for every time I heard that, I would be a rich man.

“And he still does today. Yesterday in the aisle I was there with him while he was working on the rushing moves, and I said “I’m done” and he said “No, one more”. The child never stops.

RELATED READING

Read more stories from Alex VanSumeren

Read more stories from Ben Van Sumeren

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EPA comes in as another black Michigan town faces water crisis https://blissfield.net/epa-comes-in-as-another-black-michigan-town-faces-water-crisis/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/epa-comes-in-as-another-black-michigan-town-faces-water-crisis/ [ad_1] A predominantly black town in the state of Michigan struggles to get clean drinking water and no, it’s not Flint. It’s Benton Harbor, Michigan, and it’s not the first time it’s happened. A recent report from Associated press highlighted the state’s failure to provide potable water to black taxpayers in Benton Harbor. Lead levels […]]]>


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A predominantly black town in the state of Michigan struggles to get clean drinking water and no, it’s not Flint. It’s Benton Harbor, Michigan, and it’s not the first time it’s happened.

A recent report from Associated press highlighted the state’s failure to provide potable water to black taxpayers in Benton Harbor. Lead levels in the city’s water supply are said to be higher than they were in Flint, Mich., At the height of its water crisis. As a result, many residents of Benton Harbor have been forced to rely on bottled water for their own purposes, but that’s not always an option. Several homebound residents told the Associated press that there is a hotline to call if someone needs drinking water, but the water supply often takes too long. With everything happening, local leaders in Benton Harbor, Michigan have been forced to declare a state of emergency.

The problem is clear. Benton Harbor residents need clean water, but it’s unclear exactly what caused the problem in the first place. If public authorities do not identify the root cause, the city may face a third water crisis down the line.

“What’s different about Benton Harbor from Flint – we don’t really know what caused the contamination there [in Benton Harbor], ” Nick leonard recently said WDET in Michigan.

“We have seen elevated lead levels from 2018 onwards, but there has been no similar decision or discernible event that appears to have caused this.”

Governor of Michigan Gretchen whitmer took the first step towards solving this problem. MLive.com reported that Whitmer has signed an executive directive that aims to address statewide failures in drinking water. The six-part plan will require state officials to conduct a line-by-line review of drinking water policies, among other changes in the way the state regulates the supply of drinking water.

“Our top priority here remains to ensure safe drinking water for every Michigander, no matter who they are or where they live. We will not rest until every community has clean drinking water and every parent feels confident to give their child a drink of water, ”said Whitmer.

Officials from the US Environmental Protection Agency are also intervening. EPA members will visit approximately 300 homes in Benton Harbor to test the water.

“From next week we will enter the houses and collect the water that goes through both the filter and the water itself without the filters” Terra Fong from the EPA said The Herald-Palladium.

While these efforts are a step in the right direction, this problem extends far beyond a single city. A recent report from the University of Michigan found that predominantly black cities in Michigan are systematically disadvantaged when it comes to water quality because of state laws.

“This state and this country is used to making decisions based on race that lead to racial disparities,” Rita brooks of the Flint Justice Partnership Recount Michigan Daily.

“It is unfortunate that to this day people still experience discrimination and environmental racism due to factors beyond their control. “

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Michigan City’s First Arab-American Mayor Has Message For His Youth: “Be Proud Of Your Name” https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/ https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 17:44:51 +0000 https://blissfield.net/michigan-citys-first-arab-american-mayor-has-message-for-his-youth-be-proud-of-your-name/ [ad_1] By Alaa Elassar, CNN A Michigan city considered the center of Arab America has finally elected its first Arab-American mayor. Abdullah Hammoud, the son of Lebanese immigrants, was born and raised in Dearborn, where he was elected mayor on Tuesday. With this victory, he also becomes the city’s first Muslim mayor. Dearborn is home […]]]>


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By Alaa Elassar, CNN

A Michigan city considered the center of Arab America has finally elected its first Arab-American mayor.

Abdullah Hammoud, the son of Lebanese immigrants, was born and raised in Dearborn, where he was elected mayor on Tuesday. With this victory, he also becomes the city’s first Muslim mayor.

Dearborn is home to one of the largest Arab-American communities in the USA. Dearborn’s population is around 42% Arabs, according to census figures. But more recent surveys suggest the city may be more than half Arab.

Despite the city’s large Arab community, it has never been run by an Arab-American or a Muslim-American.

“It’s just an experience of humility. It’s humiliating that in this city people are willing to vote for someone based on the direction they are leading, not the direction they are praying, ”Hammoud, 31, told CNN. “It is a lesson in humility because it shows that someone like me, who bears a name like Abdullah Hussein Hammoud, does not have to change or flee his identity in order to be successful.”

Hammoud is serving his third term as state representative for Michigan’s 15th District, which includes Dearborn. He was first elected in 2016 and has since been re-elected twice.

He will take office as mayor in January.

“This is a huge deal for the Arab community in Michigan and the country,” Sally Howell, director of the Center for Arab American Studies at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, told CNN. “The symbolic capital of Arab America, Dearborn, Michigan, finally has an Arab-American mayor to speak on behalf of this unique population. Representation matters.

Hammoud says he’s ready to get down to business and immediately start tackling the issues affecting his city, including climate change.

“There is a clock on the wall, and there is the question of when the next heavy rain is going to set in that will lead to the next catastrophic flood, similar to what we experienced last summer when near more than 20,000 homes have experienced some type of flooding, ”Hammoud said.

“We must immediately start adjusting the climate crisis by presenting bold and innovative proposals,” he said.

Hammoud will also work to cut taxes and help residents fight the health and economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic, according to his campaign website.

Hammoud says he hopes his victory sends a message to the young people of Dearborn – especially those who are targeted because of their differences – that nothing is out of reach.

“Never fear who you are,” he said. “Be proud of your name, be comfortable in your identity, because it will move you forward if you work hard, if you are passionate and if you inspire people.”

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Abdullah Hammoud: Michigan city elects first Arab mayor | Elections News https://blissfield.net/abdullah-hammoud-michigan-city-elects-first-arab-mayor-elections-news/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://blissfield.net/abdullah-hammoud-michigan-city-elects-first-arab-mayor-elections-news/ [ad_1] Dearborn, Michigan – Hundreds of people erupted for joy at a community center in Dearborn as Abdullah Hammoud’s name with a check mark beside it appeared on a giant screen, confirming he would become the city’s first Arab-American mayor. Shortly thereafter, Hammoud took to the stage as crowds rushed to the podium on Tuesday […]]]>


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Dearborn, Michigan – Hundreds of people erupted for joy at a community center in Dearborn as Abdullah Hammoud’s name with a check mark beside it appeared on a giant screen, confirming he would become the city’s first Arab-American mayor.

Shortly thereafter, Hammoud took to the stage as crowds rushed to the podium on Tuesday night with cell phones raised to document the moment that many have described as “historic.”

After his victory, the mayor-elect spoke of a “new era” in Dearborn, a city known for its large Arab and Muslim community.

“To young girls and boys who have been ridiculed for their faith or ethnicity before, to those of you who have ever felt their names unwelcome, and to our parents and our elders and to others who are humiliated for their broken and yet persistent English: Today is proof that you are as American as anyone else, ”Hammoud said.

Hammoud, a 31-year-old state official, beat former local official Gary Woronchak, winning 55% of the vote on Tuesday.

He will succeed John B O’Reilly, who did not seek re-election after being diagnosed with an undisclosed illness.

When Hammoud takes office early next year, he will also become the first Muslim and the first person of color to rule the city of nearly 110,000, one of the largest in the midwestern state of Michigan. .

Hammoud’s victory is of national significance, local experts said, as it illustrates that Arab-American communities, through increased political participation, can decisively influence election results and elect their own representatives to work on them. issues that concern them.

“We finally have Arab Americans who speak for themselves, are elected, represent their communities, gain recognition from this population, gain a voice for them,” said Sally Howell, director of the Center for Arab American Studies at the University of Michigan. Cherborn.

Locally, his election also shatters “a long legacy of racial segregation” in the city, Howell told Al Jazeera.

From 1942 to 1978, Dearborn was led by Orville Hubbard, a mayor who openly advocated for keeping ethnic communities out of town. And as recently as 1985, mayoral candidate Michael Guido, who won the election that year, released a campaign leaflet addressing what he called “the Arab problem.”

Howell, among other experts, said she estimated that well over half of Dearborn’s population is of Arab descent, a fact not reflected by the U.S. census, which considers the Arab population to be white, which leads to undercoverage.

“Finally, we have an American Arab speaking on behalf of this community which is identified with American Arabs,” Howell said of Hammoud’s victory.

Election day

Abdul El-Sayed, a public health expert who ran for governor of Michigan in 2018 but failed to win the Democratic nomination, also said Hammoud’s victory will resonate beyond the confines of the town of Dearborn.

“This offers validation of the idea that for communities like the Arab-American community of Dearborn and enclaves like it, there is power in self-determination,” he said, “and that people born and raised in these communities have great ideas, new approaches, energy and enthusiasm to inspire belief… they can win.

Abdullah Hammoud addresses his supporters after his election victory in Dearborn, Michigan on November 2 [Ali Harb/Al Jazeera]

Tuesday night’s results ended months of campaigning in Dearborn. The mayoral campaign started with seven candidates, but only Hammoud and Woronchak – the first two to win votes in an August primary – made it to the final round.

Earlier in the day, campaign volunteers – some wrapped in blankets to protect themselves from the cold November temperatures – sat as close as they legally could to the entrances to polling stations, handing out placards and flyers .

They shouted the names of their favorite candidates, urging passers-by to vote for them.

Besides the mayoral race, Dearborn also elected a new seven-member city council and members of a commission that will draft a new charter for the city outlining the basic principles of local governance.

Ayah Aldarwish, a 17-year-old high school student who volunteers for the Hammoud campaign, said whoever wins, the city must unite to respond to urgent issues, including the repeated flooding that has damaged thousands of homes in Dearborn.

Aldarwish said she felt “recognized” by the candidate. “Our voices are being heard,” she told Al Jazeera.

“For everyone in Dearborn”

Woronchak, a former state official and county commissioner, had promoted his own close ties to the Arab community during the campaign, arguing that his years of experience in government made him better suited for the post than his younger opponent.

But the campaign took a turn towards identity politics in its final weeks, with Woronchak slamming Hammoud without naming him for apparently referring to Arab and Muslim Americans as “our community.”

“I think if you want to be the mayor of Dearborn and you refer to our community, you should mean our entire community, not just a group or a section of town,” Woronchak said in a campaign video released in September. . He also began to use the slogan “For All of Dearborn”.

Hammoud told Al Jazeera last week that identity can be pluralistic and that his membership in the Arab and Muslim communities in no way detracts from his ability to serve the entire city.

Voters fill out their ballots in a Yemeni-American majority neighborhood in Dearborn, Michigan, November 2 [Ali Harb/Al Jazeera]

Howell, the academic, said the mayoral campaign had taken a “more nasty turn” than many observers had hoped for. She said Woronchak’s campaign slogan implied that her opponent could not represent the whole city, but that “it backfired on him, frankly.”

Woronchak’s campaign did not respond to Al Jazeera’s request for comment.

The son of immigrants from Lebanon, Hammoud studied epidemiology and went on to earn a business degree at the University of Michigan. He said the sudden death of his older brother Ali in 2015 prompted him to “re-evaluate” his goal and run for office.

In 2016, he was elected to represent Dearborn in the state House of Representatives. Over the past five years, Hammoud has gained a reputation as a left-wing lawmaker, endorsing Bernie Sanders for the presidency in 2020 and describing himself as a “pragmatic progressive”.

Jamil Khuja, a lawyer who unsuccessfully ran for a seat on the charter commission, said it was “strange” that only candidates from minority communities were faced with questions about their ability to serve all. voters.

He compared the attacks Hammoud faced with the right-wing theories peddled during the 2008 US presidential elections that Barack Obama was a black-only president.

“It’s unfair that the minority candidate always has to convince everyone – ‘I’m going to be for everyone’ – when the white candidate has nothing to explain; it’s just sort of presumed that he’s going to represent everyone, ”Khuja told Al Jazeera.

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The LPG park will be named after a native of Gadsden, legend of the State of Michigan https://blissfield.net/the-lpg-park-will-be-named-after-a-native-of-gadsden-legend-of-the-state-of-michigan/ https://blissfield.net/the-lpg-park-will-be-named-after-a-native-of-gadsden-legend-of-the-state-of-michigan/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 02:00:25 +0000 https://blissfield.net/the-lpg-park-will-be-named-after-a-native-of-gadsden-legend-of-the-state-of-michigan/ [ad_1] The town of Gadsden and community partners will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday to inaugurate the park at the Gadsden Public Library, which will be named after a distinguished Gadsden native. Dr Clarence Underwood Jr. is expected to attend the ceremony and unveil a sign with the name of the park. He will […]]]>


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The town of Gadsden and community partners will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday to inaugurate the park at the Gadsden Public Library, which will be named after a distinguished Gadsden native.

Dr Clarence Underwood Jr. is expected to attend the ceremony and unveil a sign with the name of the park. He will also speak to students from the Gadsden area during this visit to his hometown, library director Craig Scott said.

Underwood will have a lot to say. He was a three sports star at Carver High School in the 1950s and went on to play college football and graduated from Michigan State University. He held several educational positions for over 30 years, including Michigan State Sports Director from 1999-2002 and Assistant Commissioner of the Big Ten Conference in the 1980s.

“He was a legend at my university,” Michigan state graduate Scott told members of Gadsden City Council. He credited a local group, the Brotherhood of St. Andrew of the Episcopal Church of the Holy Comforter, for suggesting that this park be named Underwood.

Underwood was inducted into the Michigan State Athletics Hall of Fame in 2017, and he continues to work with youth programs in East Lansing, Michigan.

Because the library is an educational institution, Scott said, he is happy to see it named after a longtime educator.

The dedication and ribbon cutting will take place in the park opposite the main library branch at 254 College St., Gadsden.

Contact Gadsden Times reporter Donna Thornton at 256-393-3284 or donna.thornton@gadsdentimes.com.

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